The Journal of African American History

The Journal of African American History is a peer-reviewed scholarly journal that publishes scholarship on African American history. The Journal of African American History includes research and reviews.

Articles from Vol. 88, No. 2, Spring

Black Pride Day, 1968: High School Student Activism in York, Pennsylvania
On Friday, April 5, 1968, the day following the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., 250 African American students at William Penn Senior High School, also known as "York High," in York, Pennsylvania, refused to attend class. Instead, the...
Chicago High School Students' Movement for Quality Public Education, 1966-1971
Through walkouts, boycotts, and sit-ins, black high school students in Chicago from the late 1960s until the early 1970s expressed their discontent over the inferior quality of public schooling they were receiving. Influenced by the school reform activities...
Dashikis and Democracy: Black Studies, Student Activism, and the Black Power Movement
Contemporary Black Studies programs owe a large, and largely forgotten, debt to radical social and political movements that resulted in student protest demonstrations across the country at both majority white institutions such as Columbia University,...
"Gym Crow Must Go!" Black Student Activism at Columbia University, 1967-1968
If they build the first story, blow it up. If they sneak back at night and build three stories, burn it down. And if they get nine stories built, it's yours. Take it over, and maybe we'll let them in on the weekends. (1) H. Rap Brown, 1967 When...
Henry Louis Gates Jr. on Carter G. Woodson: Open Letter to Dr. Henry Louis Gates, Jr., Harvard University. from the Executive Council-Association for the Study of African American Life and History 25 March 2003
Dear Dr. Gates: As you may know, Dr. Carter G. Woodson and others founded the Association for the Study of African American History (ASALH) in 1915. Following Dr. Woodson's death in 1950, the members of the ASALH have done their best to continue...
Introduction: African American Student Activism in the 20th Century
In the 20th century social and political activism was an important aspect of student life and culture in the United States. As historians and other social scientists begin to assess the dominant patterns and trends in movements for social change over...
Oakwood College Students' Quest for Social Justice before and during the Civil Rights Era
The Seventh-day Adventist (SDA) Church is a worldwide, multiracial, and conservative Christian denomination with a well-established educational system that includes Oakwood College, located in Huntsville, Alabama, and founded in 1896 as the denomination's...
Patterns of Student Activism at Historically Black Universities in the United States and South Africa, 1960-1977
In the ongoing campaigns to abolish legalized racial segregation in the United States, the nonviolent direct action protest strategy adopted by students at black and white colleges and universities in the South, referred to as the "sit-ins," is considered...
Taking the Lead: Dorothy Williams, NAACP Youth Councils, and Civil Rights Protests in Pittsburgh, 1961-1964
Born of humble circumstances on Independence Day, 1927, Dorothy Williams went on to help ignite a movement to free her people, African Americans, from racial discrimination in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. A career elementary school teacher in Pittsburgh's...