The Journal of African American History

The Journal of African American History is a peer-reviewed scholarly journal that publishes scholarship on African American history. The Journal of African American History includes research and reviews.

Articles from Winter

Biography, Race Vindication, and African American Intellectuals
The Special Issue published in celebration of the 80th Anniversary of The Journal of Negro History (JNH) focused on what African American intellectuals do in general, and what historians and other social scientists have done best in the pages of JNH....
Diamonds in Iowa: Blacks, Buxton, and Baseball
Between the years 1900 and 1926 in the unlikely state of Iowa, there was a coal mining town, Buxton, where a type of racial equality existed. Blacks and whites worked, played and studied side by side. During a time and in a region where racial diversity...
"I Saw the Book Talk": Slave Readings of the First Great Awakening
Charles Brockwell was horrified by the audience and its conduct at an evangelical revival meeting in mid-eighteenth-century New England. An Anglican missionary in Massachusetts, he denounced the convulsions into which the whole Country is thrown by...
John W. Blassingame (March 23, 1940-February 13, 2000). (in Memoriam)
In one of his last essays before his death on February 13, 2000, John Wesley Blassingame wrote that "One mistake that our intellectual ancestors frequently made that we must strive to avoid is that they often became alienated from the black masses...
"Location, Location, Location": The Cultural Geography of African Americans-Introduction to a Journey
So Jesus found Philip and said to him: "Be my follower." Now Philip was from Bethsaida, from the city of Andrew and Peter. Philip found Nathanael and said to him: "We have found the one of whom Moses in the Law, and Prophets wrote, Jesus, the son of...
Los Angeles Zoot: Race "Riot," the Pachuco, and Black Music Culture
Zoot(y), adj. [according to jazzman Zutty Singleton, the term was New Orleans patois for 'cute' (a suggested etym. differing from the one offered in 1943 quot, q.v.); some currency c. 1925-c. 1945, obs. since except historical; see also the much more...
Ronald Reagan and the Struggle for Black Dignity in Cinema, 1937-1953
Neo-fascism seemed to be on the rise in the United States during the summer of 1946, press reports about anti-black and anti-Semitic groups increased noticeably over the previous year, and the FBI stepped up its investigation of the Ku Klux Klan. In...
Telling the Truth: Alice Childress as Theorist and Playwright
In Their Place on the Stage: Black Women Playwrights in America (1988), Elizabeth Brown-Guillory declared that "Alice Childress is the only black woman in America whose plays have been written, produced, and published over a period of four decades."...
The Extra-Curricular Activities of Black College Students, 1868-1940
Scholars of Afro-American higher education have devoted little attention to the extra-curricular life of its students. Dwight Oliver Wendell Holmes could not find any room in his pioneering monograph The Evolution of the Negro College for a single...
The Response of the African American Press to the United States Occupation of Haiti, 1915-1934
Haiti is a unique laboratory to study the impact of the African American press on American foreign policy in the Caribbean between 1915 and 1934. And although U.S. presidents from Woodrow Wilson to Franklin D. Roosevelt expressed support for Haiti,...
The Split-Labor Phenomenon: Its Impact on West Indian Workers as a Marginal Working Class in Birmingham, England, 1948-1962
As the unification of the European Economic Community (EEC) of 1992 comes into full effect, accompanied by a rising tide of anti-immigration and racist sentiment, it does not appear that black workers will find green pastures in Britain. West Indian...