The Journal of African American History

The Journal of African American History is a peer-reviewed scholarly journal that publishes scholarship on African American history. The Journal of African American History includes research and reviews.

Articles from Vol. 92, No. 1, Winter

Ar'n't I a Woman?: Female Slaves in the Plantation South-Twenty Years After
The beauty of history is that it is such a cumulative process. Two decades ago, Deborah Gray White published a benchmark book, Ar'n't I a Woman?: Female Slaves in the Plantation South. (1) Although immediately heralded and deeply appreciated by historians...
Books Donated African World Studies Special Collection Dillard University
Aberjhani and Sandra West. Encyclopedia of the Harlem Renaissance. New York: Checkmark Books, 2003. Adams, Maurianne and John Bracey. Strangers and Neighbors: Relations Between Blacks and Jews in the United States. Amherst: University of Massachusetts...
Books Received
Allen, Austin. Origin of the Dred Scott Case: Jacksonian Jurisprudence and the Supreme Court, 1837-1857. Athens: University of Georgia Press, 2006. Pp. 286. Paper $22.95. Andrews, William L., ed. The North Carolina Roots of African American Literature:...
Carter G. Woodson Distinguished Lecturers 2006-2007
The Association for the Study of African American Life and History and The Journal of African American History are pleased to present the list of the Carter G. Woodson Distinguished Lecturers for 2006-2007. These lecturers are among the leading scholars...
Coretta Scott King and the Struggle for Civil and Human Rights: An Enduring Legacy
The legacy of Coretta Scott King (1927-2006) has begun to engage the interest of historians who seek to place her long and productive life in its proper historical context. The woman whom some saw as aloof and impenetrable was clearly more complex...
"From Motives of Delicacy": Sexuality and Morality in the Narratives of Sojourner Truth and Harriet Jacobs
In 1850 the unlettered reformer Sojourner Truth published a narrative of her life in bondage, which she dictated to Garrisonian abolitionist Olive Gilbert. In explaining that she was excising certain information from Sojourner's story, Gilbert wrote...
"In Pressing Need of Cash": Gender, Skill, and Family Persistence in the Domestic Slave Trade
Charlotte grew up on a Rockingham County, Virginia, plantation with her parents and sixteen brothers and sisters. Her family was somewhat favored by their slaveholder Charles L. Yancy because they represented nearly half of his enslaved population....
Introduction-Women, Slavery, and Historical Research
More than twenty years ago, Deborah Gray White began a serious, fully documented study of enslaved women in the antebellum South. The eventual book-length study Ar'n't I a Woman?: Female Slaves in the Plantation South, published in 1985, was the first...
"Mad" Enough to Kill: Enslaved Women, Murder, and Southern Courts
More than two hundred Missourians petitioned Governor John C. Edwards to pardon Nelly, an enslaved teenager indicted for an 1846 murder in Warren County, while twelve jurors voted to execute Celia, a young enslaved woman charged with an 1855 homicide...
"Matter out of Place": Ar'n't I a Woman? Black Female Scholars and the Academy
The substance of this response comes from three very different directions. First, I was truly moved by this tribute and I want to thank those who put the conference together in May 2005. At the same time, I am ever mindful of the growing numbers of...
"Near Andersonville": An Historical Note on Civil War Legend and Reality
A Winslow Homer painting, completed in 1865 and 1866, remains one of the famous artist's least known, but most significant works. Homer did not give his work a title, but it is best known as "Near Andersonville." It holds many meanings and mysteries...
The Question of the Slave Female Community and Culture in the American South: Methodological and Ideological Approaches
It is not certain when the first black females came to reside in the mainland British colony of Virginia. In 1619, when a divided parcel of contraband enslaved Africans, probably Kimbundu-speakers from the Kingdom of Ndongo--who had been forced aboard...
Zora Neale Hurston and a History of Southern Life
Tiffany Ruby Patterson, Zora Neale Hurston and a History of Southern Life. Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 2005. Pp. 228. Paper $22.95. Tiffany Ruby Patterson's book suggests that Zora Neale Hurston's fictional works and ethnographic studies...