The Journal of African American History

The Journal of African American History is a peer-reviewed scholarly journal that publishes scholarship on African American history. The Journal of African American History includes research and reviews.

Articles from Vol. 95, No. 3-4, Summer-Fall

"Black World View": The Institute of the Black World's Promotion of Pragmatic Nationalism, 1969-1974
In a January 1980 essay in the Black Collegian, historian Vincent Harding remembered the political activism of the early 1970s with regret and disappointment compared to the "inspiriting sense of collective action, transformative power, great victories,...
Infectious Fear: Politics, Disease, and the Health Effects of Segregation
Samuel Kelton Roberts, Jr., Infectious Fear: Politics, Disease, and the Health Effects of Segregation. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2009. Pp. 328. Paper $24.95. Cloth $59.95. Samuel K. Roberts's Infectious Fear investigates the...
Introduction-To Be Heard in Black and White: Historical Perspectives on Black Print Culture
The social and economic circumstances for enslaved and oppressed Africans and African Americans in colonial North America and the early United States republic served as the historical context for the formation of the distinct African American culture....
"I Want to Become a Part of History": Freedom Summer, Freedom Schools, and the Freedom News
If we are concerned about breaking down the power structure, then we have to be concerned about building our own institutions to replace the old, unjust, decadent ones which make up the existing power structure. --Charles Cobb, Freedom Schools...
Joel Augustus Rogers: Black International Journalism, Archival Research, and Black Print Culture
J. A. Rogers, international correspondent of the Negro press and research student in African and European history of Negroes, returned to the United States last Saturday aboard the SS Albert Ballin of the Hamburg American line after spending...
Laboring to Learn: Women's Literacy and Poverty in the Post-Welfare Era
Lorna Rivera, Laboring to Learn: Women's Literacy and Poverty in the Post-Welfare Era. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2008. Pp. 192. Cloth $70.00. Parker Palmer reminds us that "unlike many professions, teaching is always done at the dangerous...
Vaccinating Freedom: Smallpox Prevention and the Discourses of African American Citizenship in Antebellum Philadelphia
For historians of African American public health, the 2008 U.S. presidential election was a landmark event--not only because it produced the nation's first African American commander-in-chief, but also because unprecedented numbers of elderly African...
"We Are All Prisoners": Privileging Prison Voices in Black Print Culture
The April-May 1971 and October 1972 issues of The Black Scholar: Journal of Black Studies and Research were devoted to the subject "The Black Prisoner," and featured essays and poetry written by black prisoners as well as community organizers and academics...