Journal of Australian Studies

This quarterly journal publishes scholarly articles on Australian culture, society, history and literature.

Articles from No. 54-55, September-December

An Anxious Society Fears the Worst
As a recently established immigrant society, Australia quickly developed anxieties about its national identity and place in the world. Many looked elsewhere for memories of a childhood `home'. Many feared the huge numbers of Asia, while more recently...
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Antagonism as an Art Form: Brian Penton and the Politics of Provocation
David McNicoll -- not one of Australia's better-known stirrers -- tells the story of a dinner party at Frank Packer's Sydney home in 1946 with Brian Penton, then editor of the Daily Telegraph, and other Consolidated Press management staff, at which...
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Australian Literary Marriages
The stones of several of Australia's best known literary couples, the Palmers (Nettie and Vance), the Essons (Louis and Hilda), the Christesens (Clem and Nina), and one might add eventually the yet no study of the collaboration between H M and Dorothy,...
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Communism, Security and the Cold War
This article seeks to challenge the accepted interpretation of labor's anti-communism during the early years of the cold war. That interpretation assumes first, that the ALP was contaminated by a paranoid mentality and second, that the perception...
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"Dreamtime", Who's Time?: A.P. Elkin and the Construction of Aboriginal Time in the 1930s and 1940s
Our sense of the primitive impinges on our sense of ourselves - it is bound up with the selves who act in the `real', political world. Freud's map of the Psyche placed the ego ... at a point that mediates between the civilising super-ego...
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'Easter 1916' in Dublin and the Australian Press: Background and Response
The Irish easter rising of 1916 evoked both severe condemnation and rousing expressions of imperial loyalty from Irish-Australians in the secular and church press. A study of the major secular newspapers in the period shows uniform pro-empire sentiments,...
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Edward Koiki Mabo: The Journey to Native Title
Edward Koiki Mabo preferred his Murray Islander name, Koiki, to the colonialist, Eddie, by which he was known to the Australian public. Koiki was the name used by other Murray Islanders and by those white Australians who had become close friends and...
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Following David Unaipon's Footsteps
David Unaipon was born in 1872. His aspirations led him in many directions. He retained a lifelong fascination with science, working until his death on the scientific holy grail, a perpetual motion machine. Press articles labelled him `Australia's...
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Frank Hardy: The World's Greatest Hoaxter
The 1990s could be fairly described as the decade of the hoax. During this time a number of Australian writers and artists have adopted different personae for a variety of reasons.(3) In the literary world the most controversial case is Helen Darville...
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Fred Paterson - the People's Champion
By now, most students of Australian history know that the ex-divinity student, Rhodes Scholar and radical barrister, Frederick Woolnough Paterson, the MLA for Bowen from 1944-1950, was Australia's first and only communist member of parliament. They...
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From Bush Battler to City Editor: Louisa Lawson and the 'Dawn.'(Battlers and Stirrers)
Louisa Lawson was formidable. She had to be. She was born into grinding poverty in rural New South Wales, where her parents ran a shanty house and her father was a drunkard. From an early age both parents urged her into marriage as a means of finding...
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Interview with Phil Cleary
Phil Cleary is in the process of writing an autobiography. Apart from it being a particularly readable narrative, I suspect it will make a contribution to the literature of Australian history. Phil's early life is typical, in many ways, of the lives...
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Jean Devanny: Romantic Revolutionary
This paper looks at the situation of a woman revolutionary in the Australia of the 1930s and 1940s. It investigates aspects of the life of Jean Devanny -- her position as woman, woman novelist and writer, public speaker and orator and socialist and...
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Manning Clark and the Ratbag Tradition
In 1996, five years after his death, Manning Clark was again the headlines. A Brisbane Courier-Mail journalist cited Les Murray, the poet, and Geoffrey Fairbairn, a historian from Clark's own Australian National University, as having witnessed Clark...
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National Complacency? Australia in the Later Menzies Years: The Evidence of 'Prospect,' 'The Observer' and 'Nation,' 1958-64
Nineteen fifty eight witnessed a minor renaissance in Australian intellectual life. The Bulletin, by now something of an anachronism (with its banner `Australia for the White Man' not yet removed by Donald Horne) was joined by a number of other publications,...
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New Politics and Social Movements: The Ethnic Dimension
Recent events have underlined the potentially disturbing impact of immigration and ethnicity on national politics. The election of Pauline Hanson in March 1996, with a swing of 19% towards her, followed the appearance at various by-elections of candidates...
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'Out of Hand' - the Battles of Neville Bonner
`Stirrer' suits Neville Bonner insofar as it minimises any claim to political consistency and captures his theatrical quality. Yet Bonner's deference to authority is hardly befitting of a stirrer. A `battler' perhaps? That's a lable many can embrace,...
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Socialist Realism in the Australian Literary Context: With Specific Reference to the Writing of Katharine Susannah Prichard
On 26 December 1933 Katharine Susannah Prichard, ill and thin, was helped down the gangplank onto the Fremantle wharf. Earlier, in London during her return trip from a voyage to the Soviet Union, she had learned from a newspaper headline that her...
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'That Shy Mysterious Poet Arthur Stace.' (graffiti)(Battlers and Stirrers)
It would be a fair generalisation to say that most academic discussion of graffiti seems to focus on either sociological visual semiotics as `street art', or else some combination of these two approaches. I want to open up a discussion about graffiti's...
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The Legend You Could Come and See: Celebrating Phar Lap
In his autobiography, Barry Humphries wrote of the Melbourne of his childhood and adolescence: When my father took me into town and he was not on business, we would often visit two places, the Museum and the Aquarium. At the Museum he would...
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The Politics of Tariff Formation: The Case of the Iron and Steel Industry, 1900-1926
Australia's Policy of tariff protection was formulated in the years after federation. As a part of this process the steel industry was granted significant protection from import competition during the 1920s after receiving little support before the...
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Veronica Brady
Veronica Brady's long and distinguished career as a critic and teacher of Australian literature has been marked by a level of political commitment practically unmatched in the Australian academy.(1) As critic, teacher and member of the Loreto teaching...
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Writing from Life
I've singled out `from' in this phrase Writing from Life as my stepping-off point. Essentially, `from' is where it's at. `From' is the mediator, the mystery area, a sort of gestalt shangri-la where the important transformations take place, or should....
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