Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media

A professional and scholarly quarterly presenting research in communication and electronic media. Covers topics on media uses, effects of media, regulation, history, organization, advertising, technology, news, and entertainment.

Articles from Vol. 46, No. 1, March

Americans' Exposure to Political Talk Radio and Their Knowledge of Public Affairs
Although call-in programs have been on radio since the 1930s, talk shows emerged as a new medium for political communication during the early 1990s (Davis & Owen, 1998). Yet, the size of political talk radio's audience has declined since the early...
An Investigation of Elaboration and Selective Scanning as Mediators of Learning from the Web versus Print
The last decade of the 20th century witnessed the movement of the World Wide Web from infancy to what now might be considered adolescence. Traditional print and broadcast media outlets have rushed to the Web to take advantage of the benefits of this...
Equal Time in Prime Time? Scheduling Favoritism and Gender on the Broadcast Networks
Few businesses experience the rampant uncertainty of prime-time television. Two decades ago, Gitlin (1983) noted that approximately two thirds of programs in the 1980 and 1981 seasons failed. The odds of success have not increased since. According...
Is There Enough Time on the Clock? Parental Involvement and Mediation of Children's Television Viewing
Over the last three decades, content analysts have measured the varying extent of violent or sexual material on network and cable television, justifying their research, in part, on its potential effects on child viewers (e.g., Comstock & Paik,...
Online and in the Know: Uses and Gratifications of the Web for Political Information
In advancing an agenda for studying the Internet, several new technology researchers have advocated a uses and gratifications approach to examining the motives for why individuals use the Internet. These calls for the uses and gratifications approach...
Television News, Prejudicial Pretrial Publicity, and the Depiction of Race
Fundamental to the philosophy of justice in American society is the idea that defendants are presumed to be innocent until proven guilty. However communication researchers, psychologists, and legal scholars have suggested that prejudicial pretrial...
The Internet Audience: Web Use as Mass Behavior
At last count, over 160 million people in the United States had access to the Internet, and in a typical week nearly 100 million actually logged on (Nielsen// NetRatings, 2001). Whether e-mail, e-commerce, or just "surfing," this activity is, often...
Third-Person Effect, Gender, and Pornography on the Internet
The rapid, worldwide growth of the Internet leads to unprecedented opportunities in applications in business, communication, education, and entertainment (Hagel & Armstrong, 1997; Johnson, 1997; Schawrtz, 1997; Tapscott, Lowy, & Ticoll, 1998)....