Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media

A professional and scholarly quarterly presenting research in communication and electronic media. Covers topics on media uses, effects of media, regulation, history, organization, advertising, technology, news, and entertainment.

Articles from Vol. 50, No. 2, June

Audience Flow Past and Present: Television Inheritance Effects Reconsidered
Inheritance effects are one of the most important, and robust, of all television audience behaviors. Also known as lead-in effects, or simply audience flow, they have been routinely reported in the academic literature for over 40 years. Essentially,...
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Children of the Net: An Empirical Exploration into the Evaluation of Internet Content
Throughout the last decade a primary concern raised by users and providers of Internet content was information credibility. Because the Internet has no government or ethical regulations controlling the majority of its available content, credible online...
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Connections between Internet Use and Political Efficacy, Knowledge, and Participation
Over the past decades, the amount of available political information has expanded, thanks in part to the Internet. Political candidates have been using the Internet to update individuals through e-mail (Bimber, 1998), to provide information about their...
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Getting Hooked on News: Uses and Gratifications and the Formation of News Habits among College Students in an Internet Environment
The question of how people select among media news sources has long been of interest to both political scientists (Althaus & Tewksbury, 2000; McLeod, Scheufele, & Moy, 1999; Moy, Pfau, & Kahlor, 1999; Scheufele, 2000; Shah, Kwak, &...
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Judging the Degree of Violence in Media Portrayals: A Cross-Genre Comparison
Ever since the rise in popularity of television in American households from the 1950s and continuing to today, the public has been complaining that there is too much violence in TV programming. In fact, the public has continually been putting pressure...
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Maxwell McCombs: Agenda-Setting Explorer
Max McCombs is widely known among communication scholars, for he has devoted almost four decades to building agenda setting from a successful hypothesis into a robust and popular theory of how news influences the salience of issues. From the initial...
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Media Representations of Race, Prototypicality, and Policy Reasoning: An Application of Self-Categorization Theory
Race-related political issues and public policy themes continue to be among the most debated topics in contemporary United States society (Sears, Van Laar, Carrillo, & Kosterman, 1997). Among the myriad factors known to inform public opinion on...
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Older Characters in Children's Animated Television Programs: A Content Analysis of Their Portrayal
Because young children have a difficult time telling the difference between fantasy and reality, they are highly susceptible to the socializing effects of television, especially those shows on children's television channels and animated programs (K....
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Reality Television and Third-Person Perception
Scores of third-person perception studies have demonstrated the fact that individuals believe other people are more affected by media messages than they themselves are (Perloff, 1993). From Davison's (1983) early work with persuasive media to a variety...
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Television News Avoidance: Exploratory Results from a One-Year Follow-Up Study
Many if not most mainstream television channels in most countries broadcast some form of news program. The news is so ubiquitous that no social scientist has probably ever felt the need to explain what kind of genre or type of program he or she was...
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Where Have All the Historians Gone? A Challenge to Researchers
Although Americans have enjoyed radio for 85 years and television for 65, we find that the overall historical record of this pervasive industry remains appallingly sparse. We argue here for a renewed historical research effort into some important but...
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