Journal of Broadcasting & Electronic Media

A professional and scholarly quarterly presenting research in communication and electronic media. Covers topics on media uses, effects of media, regulation, history, organization, advertising, technology, news, and entertainment.

Articles from Vol. 52, No. 2, June

Constructing Gender Stereotypes through Social Roles in Prime-Time Television
According to screenwriting guru Syd Field (1994), characters inhabit professional and personal roles. A character's professional life reveals what that character does for a living. A character's personal life reflects her or his romantic relationships...
Cultivation Effects on Quality of Life Indicators: Exploring the Effects of American Television Consumption on Feelings of Relative Deprivation in South Korea and India
Decades of research have demonstrated that television may affect viewers' perceptions of social reality, with the influence of television on viewers' perceptions thought to be particularly strong when viewers lack direct experience with the content...
Direct and Indirect Aggression on Prime-Time Network Television
The daily news is filled with stories of conflict. And our TV sitcom "entertainment" is almost always based on conflict and people who handle it poorly. In fact much of the so-called "humor" in those sitcoms is nothing more than a series of destructive,...
Food and Beverage Advertising on U.S. Television: A Comparison of Child-Targeted versus General Audience Commercials
Over the last 30 years, the percentage of U.S. children classified as overweight and obese has more than tripled (Anderson and Butcher, 2006; Centers for Disease Control, 2004). The American Academy of Pediatrics notes similar increases in medical...
Responding to Change on TV: How Viewer-Controlled Changes in Content Differ from Programmed Changes in Content
It seems safe to say that the remote control has fundamentally changed television viewing. Nearly every television sold in the United States today comes equipped with a remote control (Frisby, 1999; Zenith). People fight over who wields it (McBride,...
Socialization to Work in Late Adolescence: The Role of Television and Family
Socialization has been defined as the process of learning the attitudes, values, and behavior patterns of a given society or group in order to function effectively within it (Elkind & Handel, 1989; Schaefer, 2005). One of the primary goals of socialization...
The Effects of Sex in Television Drama Shows on Emerging Adults' Sexual Attitudes and Moral Judgments
Sexual behavior implicates important public health concerns in the United States. Youth between the ages of 15 and 24 have the highest rates of STDs (Fox, 2004) and represent about half of the estimated 19 million new STD infections each year (CDC,...
The Games through the NBC Lens: Gender, Ethnic, and National Equity in the 2006 Torino Winter Olympics
No megasporting event (Eastman, Newton, & Pack, 1996) encapsulates the national zeitgeist in the same manner as the Olympic telecast, with 168 million Americans (Ryan, 2006) consuming at least a portion of even the Winter Olympic Games. In 2006,...
The Influence of Television News Depictions of the Images of War on Viewers
The Bush administration has repeatedly criticized news media coverage of the war in Iraq as imbalanced because, as former White House press secretary, Scott McClellan, put it, the "horrific images of violence that we see on our TV screens" drown out...