USA TODAY

Founded in September of 1982, USA Today is a national daily newspaper published by Gannett Co., Inc. The paper has a Mon.-Thurs. circulation of over 2 million readers. The Friday edition of the paper has a circulation of over 2.5 million readers.The Editor of USA Today is John Hillkirk.

Articles from Vol. 128, No. 2660, May

A Dozen Rules for Career Success
Change is the name of the game in the workplace. People need to ensure their future marketability by becoming career activists. "It's no longer possible to be a passive player in our own career management," Barbara Moses, a career-management consultant,...
Americans Optimistic about Their Longevity
On average, Americans estimate they will live about one year longer than statistics of life expectancy suggest they will, according to a study by John Mirowsky, professor of sociology, Ohio State University, Columbus. Men and blacks are most optimistic...
Are You SURE You Want This Job?
Despite the fertile job market that awaits them, this year's college graduates should be aware of what not to do in a job interview. OfficeTeam, a staffing service for office and administrative professionals, asked its managers nationwide to describe...
Balancing Technology's Impact
Computers and communications equipment are proving a great benefit to the environment, but the disposal of obsolete hardware is causing an ecological headache. THE SILICON VALLEY Toxics Coalition (SVTC) is a grassroots organization in California...
BLACK-JEWISH RELATIONS and the Rise and Fall of Liberalism
In 1965, in Selma, Ala., Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel of New York's Jewish Theological Seminary marched with Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr., and thousands more on behalf of voting rights. The tall, bearded theologian with flowing locks led at least one...
Can Video Games Lead to Heart Disease?
Teenage boys who play violent video games may face a greater risk of developing heart disease later in life, according to research conducted by Paul Lynch, a first-year student in the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine, Oklahoma City. While...
Confronting the Threat of Ballistic Missile Proliferation
DESPITE THE END of the Cold War, America has not fully escaped the threat of attack by intercontinental ballistic missiles (ICBMs). On Jan. 23, 1996, a triumphant Pres. Clinton proclaimed, "For the first time since the dawn of the nuclear age, there...
Crime, Congress and the Interstate Commerce Clause
MAYBE IT WAS a matter of timing (former White House intern Monica Lewinsky's book was first reaching the stores), but when a Federal appeals court declared the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) unconstitutional in March, 1999, it didn't get much attention....
Despite Everything, a Giant at Heart
MAY 1, 1883. Before being overshadowed by the date of my marriage and then the birth of my children, that particular 19th-century May Day holiday provided a personal reason to celebrate: It marked the fast game ever played by my favorite baseball team....
Disturbing Trends in GLOBAL PRODUCTION
As U.S. corporations farm out their manufacturing overseas, they are becoming enmeshed in labor conditions that are violations of basic human rights and public relations nightmares. ON THE U.S. ISLAND territory of Saipan, workers are held in virtual...
Ethnic Conflict and Pipeline Politics in THE CAUCASUS
THE YOUNG language instructor took on an expression of hurt bewilderment when the topic of conversation turned to Nagorno-Karabakh, the Armenian enclave in Azerbaijan, the former Soviet republic on the Caspian Sea. Ancient hatreds? "Nothing of the...
Even Museums Love Sara Lee
Through the Millennium Gift of Sara Lee Corporation, 52 paintings and sculptures from the company's collection have been donated to 40 museums throughout the world. UNLIKE MOST corporate collections, that of Sara Lee Corporation has only one source--its...
How to Boost ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT
NEARLY 40% of America's fourth-graders read below the basic level on national tests. On international tests, the nation's 12th-graders rank last in advanced physics, compared with students in 18 other countries. One-third of all incoming college freshmen...
Important Health Tips for Summer Travelers
Summer is almost here and, if you are like most Americans, you will be taking at least one trip during the warmer months. When traveling this summer, don't forget to plan ahead for possible medical emergencies and for everyday health needs. That means...
Job-Hunting Made Easier for Graduates
"Finding a job after I graduate? No problem. There are plenty of companies begging for graduates in my field." That's a common refrain echoing across college campuses each fall. However, according to John W. Hobart, a job search expert and the author...
Looking at SKIN CANCER in a Different Light
Think twice before you set out to get a suntan this summer. IT IS DIFFICULT to imagine today, but for hundreds of years in Europe and the U.S., a suntan branded one as an inferior person. A bronzed face and hands were a sign of the lower classes--those...
Oscar Ennui
I CAME AWAY from this year's Oscars with a too-familiar sinking feeling. There was a time when I would wait in anticipation for the annual ceremony of the Academy Awards. There was a time when, as I recollect, it meant something to keep track of the...
Random Ramblings
THERE ARE few absolutes. Truth may be one of them, but, because we are humans, our participation in truth is necessarily finite, relative, and historical. As the wisdom of the Talmud has it, "We do not see things the way they are; we see them the way...
Reconnecting with Iran
THERE WAS A TIME when Iran was the best friend the U.S. had in the Middle East. Although the relationship was primarily strategic, focusing on the non-Arab state as a buttress against feared Arab military strength, there were numerous linkages between...
Remodel or Move?
You're tired of the old house. You want more space, different rooms, or a new neighborhood. It's time to trade up to another home, maybe even build a new home. Or is it? Would remodeling or adding on be the better way to go? A lot of money is involved...
Restoring Broadly Shared PROSPERITY
DESPITE a relatively robust economy, a booming stock market, low levels of unemployment, and high business profits, the political, social, and economic gains from America's long period of broadly shared prosperity between 1940 and the early 1970s are...
Returning to Work after Cancer Diagnosis
After receiving a cancer diagnosis, you may not feel up to the challenge of returning to work, but issues such as finances and job security often require you to do just that. According to the Mayo Clinic Women's HealthSource, going back to work during...
SECOND IMPACT SYNDROME: Sports Confront Consequences of Concussions
EACH YEAR, more than 300,000 people suffer brain injuries while playing a sport, most of which are concussions. In football slang, players say a team member got "dinged" or had his "bell rung." Boxers who get stunned by a blow to the head may be described...
Separation Triggers Kids' Greatest Anxiety
Many children fear the boogie man and the monster under the bed, but some kids' anxieties have nothing to do with make-believe creatures. For them, separating from their parents--even for a short time--creates great physical or emotional distress....
Summertime, and the Tax Savings Are Easy
SUMMER is coming, bringing heat and humidity, but don't sweat it. You're going to be cool with summertime tax deductions to chill the IRS. Next April 15 won't be like getting a house call from Dr. Kevorkian. Here's how it works: Put 'em to work....
TELEVISION NEWS: Information or Infotainment?
A 1999 GALLUP POLL revealed that Hustler publisher Larry Flynt enjoys a higher personal approval rating (42%) than House Judiciary Committee chairman Henry Hyde (30%). I can't think of a better or more disturbing example of the tremendous power of...
The Dilemma of Income Inequality
FOR MORE THAN 30 YEARS, according to the Census Bureau, income inequality in America has widened. The standard statistic to measure such inequality is called the "gini index." The greater the number, the wider the disparity between the rich and the...
The Media, Pharmaceutical Companies, and Consumers
TURN ON your television set or pick up your favorite magazine and there they are, snazzy commercials and advertisements hawking the latest prescription drugs for every conceivable mild or even serious malady that seems to plague 21st-century Americans:...
The Myth of Suburban Sprawl
TO MILLIONS of Americans, a house in the suburbs with a nice yard, garden, and a little open space is the American Dream. To environmentalists and urban planners, though, it is a nightmare. The invectives they use to describe suburbia reveal a visceral...
The Rising Tide of Women's Leadership
PARENTS worried that their daughters may not have the same opportunities as their sons can breathe a little easier. Kaitlin Ofman, 10, told The New York Times in the spring of 1999 that, "if by the time ... I'm maybe 30 or so, I don't see a woman president,...
The U.S. Must Answer the Challenge of SPACEPOWER
WITH ITS HARDWARE and brainpower, the U.S. has unchallenged mastery of air, sea, and land. Except for the government's failure to defend citizens from ballistic missiles--a glaring, reprehensible exception--no one can seriously threaten America. ...
Treasures of the Topkapi Palace
Rare art and artifacts from the royal home of the Ottoman sultans are dazzling to behold. THE MAJESTIC Topkapi Palace, a seaside complex of buildings with extraordinary views of Asia and Europe, was constructed in the 15th century by Sultan Mehmed...
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