USA TODAY

Founded in September of 1982, USA Today is a national daily newspaper published by Gannett Co., Inc. The paper has a Mon.-Thurs. circulation of over 2 million readers. The Friday edition of the paper has a circulation of over 2.5 million readers.The Editor of USA Today is John Hillkirk.

Articles from Vol. 130, No. 2679, December

Animals Have Emotions and Personalities. (Zoology)
Cats, dogs, hyenas, and other animals have personality traits in much the same way humans do, according to Samuel D. Gosling, a University of Texas at Austin psychologist who is working toward developing a new field in animal personality. He believes...
Are SAT Scores "Worse Than Meaningless"? (Testing)
Ranking states according to their SAT averages is "worse than meaningless," warn Greg Marchant and Sharon Paulson, education experts at Ball State University, Muncie, Ind. "The state SAT rankings are worthless in determining the quality of the schools...
Assuring Security of Dangerous Pesticides. (Chemicals)
Lawn care businesses, farmers, agricultural chemical dealers, and exterminators are among businesses that regularly use pesticides. With recent threats to the U.S., security of these chemicals becomes critical, so the Environmental Protection Agency...
Avoiding Fraud When Shopping Online. (Consumerism)
The National Fraud Information Center (NFIC), a project of the nonprofit National Consumers League, was established in 1992 to combat the economic and social menace of telemarketing fraud. In 1996, the Internet Fraud Watch (IFW) was created to operate...
Avoiding Holiday Debt Blues. (Shopping)
With a slumping economy and a nation consumed with fears of terrorism, economists expect Americans to spend less this coming holiday season, but that doesn't mean some shoppers won't lay out more on gifts than they planned. Excess holiday spending...
Better Day Care Boosts Skills. (Children)
Youngsters who spent their first four and a half years in higher-quality child care arrangements scored better on tests of cognitive skills and language ability than did those in lower-quality care, according to findings from the largest long-term...
Caring for Fireplaces and Wood-Burning Stoves. (Safety)
With the chill of winter approaching, the thought of warming up by a crackling, toasty fire is enticing. Before lighting that match, though, experts advise ensuring that your fireplace or wood-burning stove is operating properly in order to maintain...
Challenging the Dinosaur-Bird Link. (Evolution)
Discovery of the oldest animal ever known to have feathers, which may have been the ancestor of birds, but clearly was not a dinosaur, calls into serious question many theories about an evolutionary link between dinosaurs and birds. Paleontologists...
Don't Alarm Family over World Crisis. (Anxiety)
Parents should not alarm their families over the current world crisis, caution Rebecca Adams and Richard Carr, who teach family relations in the Department of Family and Consumer Sciences, Ball State University, Muncie, Ind. They say that talking about...
Ensuring Safety of Holiday Meal. (Food)
It's time to relish the flavors of your favorite holiday meal. Before you serve it to your family and friends, though, are you sure it's safe to eat? According to statistics released by the Federal government, 76,000,000 Americans are sickened each...
Erase Problems While You Still Are Able to. (Debt)
With the economy slowing, now is the time to lower excessive household debt. Families currently in decent financial shape may find themselves in a serious state in the event that jobs disappear or other hardships occur. Some economists have said this...
Finding Links to Child Abuse. (Domestic Violence)
A study by researchers at Oregon State University, Corvallis, suggests that how parents view their offspring is a critical factor in the risk potential for child abuse, and it may be even more important than whether the parents are abusive to each...
Finding Someone for New Year's Eve. (Dating)
With about a month left to find a date for New Year's Eve, pressure is mounting for American singles who would rather pair up with someone special than face the evening alone. One-third of adults place a high priority on finding a romantic partner...
How to Improve Your "People Smartness." (Psychology)
If super-sized burgers and fries are ruining our waistlines, then fast-food communication--e-mail, pagers, and other technologies--are making us "interpersonally flabby," maintains psychologist Mel Silverman, coordinator of the Adult and Organizational...
Job Scams: Ads That Don't Add Up. (Fraud)
The ad in the help wanted section of his local newspaper looked like the opportunity of a lifetime: high-paying wildlife jobs with the Federal government. The Delaware man called the toll-free telephone number listed to get more information about Federal...
Memory Starts Declining by Mid 20s. (Aging)
People in their 20s don't usually complain about forgetting names or phone numbers, or having difficulty learning something new. Yet, that's when memory and mental energy first start to decline, according to psychologist Denise Park, who directs the...
Noteworthy. (Newsview)
Counseling has proved its value following the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon. In the aftermath, survivors, rescue workers, grieving families, and even people not directly affected by the tragedies have sought out counselors...
Protecting Products' Distinctive Designs. (Law)
The distinctive design of a product provides a powerful competitive advantage. Therefore, it should be legally protected, according to Lydie Arthos Hudson, an intellectual property attorney at Lathrop & Clark LLP, Madison, Wis. The first step...
Rating Your Fiscal Fitness. (Finance)
You exercise five days a week, watch your diet, get enough sleep every night, and have an annual physical exam. You pride yourself on being physically fit and taking good care of yourself. You want to be in shape to enjoy your retirement and later...
Reassessing in the Wake of Terrorism. (Personal Finances)
It is a sad axiom that tragedy motivates actions previously neglected. In the wake of the devastating terrorist attacks on Sept. 11, many Americans will want to reevaluate their personal finances, focusing particularly on those components they have...
Saving Lives with Suspended Animation. (Medicine)
The ability to bring back patients from death after severe trauma or a heart arrest looms in the not-too-distant future, Peter Safar, Distinguished Professor of Resuscitation Medicine, University of Pittsburgh (Pa.), told the American Society of Anesthesiology....
Scribbles Can Measure Kids' Development. (Child Development)
When is a scribble not just a scribble? Child development experts say kids' scribbles can indicate to a parent the progress in toddlers' learning, demonstrating the relationship between their motor and intellectual skills. Typically, toddlers draw...
Snack Craving May Predict Career Choice. (Behavior)
The average American will have three to five careers, 10 to 12 jobs. and will hold each one for an average of 3.5 years throughout his or her lifetime, according to the U.S. Department of Labor. Does this sound familiar? Are you still struggling to...
Sunny Days Spark Stock Market Optimism. (Investment)
When the sun is shining on Wall Street, it does more than put the brokers in a good mood--it gives a lift to the stock market. A study has found that morning sunshine at the sites of 26 leading stock exchanges around the world--including the New York...
Treating Deductions for Post-Attack Charities. (Taxation)
Americans are responding to the terrorism attacks in New York and Washington with an enormous outpouring of charitable giving. A large number of new charitable organizations have been formed to address the needs of the victims and their families. ...
Tsunamis a Threat to Pacific Northwest. (Geology)
On the evening of July 17, 1998, villagers on the northern coast of Papua New Guinea were finishing a quiet day when a magnitude 7.1 earthquake suddenly shook the area and the offshore ocean bottom lurched upwards. At first, the sea receded. Then,...
Who Owns Patent Rights-Employers or Employees? (Inventions)
Employers may assume they have rights to market or produce an employee invention, but that is not always the case, indicates Jeffry W. Smith, a patent attorney at the Lathrop & Clark law firm, Madison, Wis. "Employee inventors present unique problems...