USA TODAY

Founded in September of 1982, USA Today is a national daily newspaper published by Gannett Co., Inc. The paper has a Mon.-Thurs. circulation of over 2 million readers. The Friday edition of the paper has a circulation of over 2.5 million readers.The Editor of USA Today is John Hillkirk.

Articles from Vol. 123, No. 2590, July

After Floods: Restoring Ecosystems
Decaying riverfronts have been turned into public parks and tourist attractions, and farmland has been revitalized by nutrient deposits. The flood of 1993 was the result of an unwitting alignment between the forces of nature and the civil works...
American Foreign Policy Must Evaluate New Priorities
American foreign policy stands at a crossroads. The two main players, Pres. Clinton and Secretary of State Warren M. Christopher, have to decide whether to follow what has been labeled neo-Cold War orthodoxy. This approach is based on the contention...
American Society Is Plummeting Downhill
Democracy has its roots in ancient Greece. Its express goal there was to lift all citizens in a quest for excellence. Whether looking to the Olympics, the theater, literature, government, discussions held in the marketplace, or the general culture,...
Breaking the Seals of Silence: Anti-Mafia Uprising in Sicily
With the recent rash of assassinations, the Mafia has alienated the public that once tolerated it. In the spring and early summer of 1992, it may have seemed to the outside world that the brutal assassinations of judges Giovanni Falcone and Paolo...
Can Taxpayers Count on a "Peace Dividend"?
If the cold war is over, why aren't factories, military bases, and laboratories converting to civilian work? What's going on is a permanent war economy in which military activity is large and continuous, and the military output is treated as an ordinary...
Can We Save the Pacific Northwest Salmon?
It is hard to tell someone from outside the Pacific Northwest how important the salmon is to the fabric of that region. Revered by Native Americans, sought after by sport fishermen, and regarded as a cash crop by an entire industry, the salmon is a...
Clinton and the Military
No one can understand the senior leadership of the American military without a close appreciation of the Vietnam legacy. Most of them were junior officers in Southeast Asia and have spent a good part of their careers since then contemplating the lessons...
Doing Business in the New Vietnam
"Your Indochina no longer exists. It is dead," a girl tells her adoptive French mother in the film "Indochine." The Indochina of the 1930s - Vietnam, Cambodia, and Laos - was at the incipient stage of yet another revolution to throw out the foreign...
Downsizing: The Bottom Line
Xerox, GM, AT&T, IBM, Kodak, Fleet Financial Group, Apple. What do these names have in common? The answer is downsizing, a term relatively new to the business world. The word has a certain euphemistic ring to it. Corporations maintain that this...
Flooding: Who Is to Blame?
By building on historic floodplains, man is as responsible as nature for the devastation of rampaging rivers. During the summer of 1993, the Upper Mississippi River Basin and Lower Missouri River Basin experienced levels of flooding unprecedented...
Frightful Films Spook Fraidy Cats
If you sit with your back to the wall while reading a murder mystery or check all the locks twice after seeing "Friday the 13th," it might be because you are a highly arousable person-someone who tends to be distracted by noise and very bothered by...
How to Take Control of Your Spending
One of the first steps to building a secure future is to manage your cash flow - how money flows into and out of your household. "Management of cash flow is probably the most troublesome aspect of financial planning, and almost everyone seems to have...
Is It Possible to Regulate Television Violence?
A recent poll disclosed that more than 60% of respondents favored regulations to control the amount of violence in the media. Several times during the first weeks of 1994, Pres. Clinton implied the need to curtail media violence. Early in 1994, Reed...
Keeping Kids Safe in the Sun
One blistering sunburn suffered as a child doubles the chances for skin cancer later in life. Melanoma and other skin problems related to excessive sun exposure are reasons why dermatologists emphasize the importance of teaching children and their...
Limiting the Impact of Future Floods
The flood of 1993 on the Mississippi and Missouri rivers significantly will influence national water resources and environmental policy in much the same way that those of 1927 and 1935 resulted in the Flood Control Acts of 1928 and 1936. These acts...
Made in USA: Productivity and Competitiveness in Manufacturing
If a serious attack is to be made on the budget deficit, support of technology provides one way to return the economy to trade balance with a strong dollar To all appearances, America's once-vaunted manufacturing sector is in trouble. The picture...
MIssing Children: A Fearful Epidemic
Police, legislators, and policymakers must be mobilized to build a network capable of identifying and apprehending offenders who victimize youngsters. In recent months, the nation has been riveted by news of child abductions in Petaluma, Calif.;...
Philanthropy Has Lost Its Way
"Why spend $100,000 on a soup kitchen to feed the hungry when you can spend the same amount to produce a study that will influence legislators to increase Federal spending on food stamps for all?" The nonprofit or independent sector is growing at...
Reforming National Flood Insurance
Barely a month goes by lately without a major new natural disaster hitting some area of the U.S. and leaving in its wake ever-increasing claims on taxpayer dollars. As Mississippi Valley floodwaters slowly drained away with the last vestiges of summer,...
Revisionism, History and Hollywood
The 1991 release of Oliver Stone's "JFK" set off a huge debate about Hollywood's tendency to "distort" history or otherwise color viewers' perceptions of the past. This sensitivity to the relationship between film images and real political and historical...
Saluting the Sphinx of the Slab
The ability to live in the here and now may be God's greatest gift-the baseball gods, that is. Steve Carlton knew that special zone like no other left-handed pitcher of the past quarter-century. He's going to Cooperstown this month, and the Hall of...
Seafood Safety: Consumers and Manufacturers at Risk
Extensive Media coverage of a handful of deaths and hundreds of illnesses from tainted meat has brought the issues of food safety and inspection into Americans' homes. Many who never had doubted the government's ability to protect them from contaminated...
Summer Activities Keep Weight Down
Trying to keep your weight down? It's not necessary to start running 10 miles a day. Normal summer activities may be the best answer. According to Darlene A. Sedlock, associate professor of kinesiology, Purdue University, staying active is the way...
Summertime Can Be Rough for Overweight Children
While most kids look forward to summer and the freedom the season affords, youngsters who are overweight may see it differently. "These children may be more self-conscious and therefore, more sedentary," explains Randall C. Flanery, assistant professor...
The Immune System vs. Stress
Psychological distress can suppress the body's defenses to the point of inducing physical illness. A college student suffers from a strep throat infection while studying for final exams. A corporate executive loses her voice prior to an important...
The Lifelong Impact of Adoption
In many cases, birthparents have trouble dealing with giving up their offspring; adoptees want to know more about their biological roots and genetic history; and adoptive parents are being confronted with issues concerning the raising of their adopted...
The Outlawing of Religion in America
Utter the word "God" in public and you may find yourself guilty of a misdemeanor carrying a fine of $150 for the first offense, $500 for the second, and six months to one year in jail for the third. "Nonsense," you say?, "It can't happen here." Before...
Thomas Alva Edison after Forty: The Challenge of Success
The great inventor had failed to foresee the effect of changes in the world around him. Thus, his work in the second half of his life never attained the level he reached in earlier years. In 1887, at the age of 40, with a new wife, new home, and...
Tough Lessons from Recent Floods
For centuries, the Mississippi and Missouri rivers have served a myriad of roles - as highways to settle the nation, commercial corridors to float logs and move farm crops to domestic and foreign markets, and water bodies to assimilate wastes. They...
Trees Enhance Property Values
A survey of realtors in 10 states, conducted by Arbor National Mortgage, Inc., Uniondale, N.Y., demonstrates that trees play a role in determining property value and that their presence (or absence) can affect a home's desirability to buyers. More...
Turn-of-the-Century American Impressionism and Realism
One genteel, the other gritty and uncompromising, these two artistic movements portray the nation's rich cultural and natural diversity. Two important movements in the history of painting are featured in the exhibition, "American Impressionism and...
What's Behind Soaring College Costs?
As the price of student aid, administration, salaries, research, maintenance, and technology climb, the cost of higher education mounts inexorably. American higher education is under fire. The public's overriding concern is the rising cost of tuition....
Who's the Real Victim?
It has been an American tradition to admire the outlaw, the Western gunslinger, the young couple who rob banks, and the citizen vigilante. Today, television coverage of news events that eventually end up in court has created a new kind of hero for...
Who's Who in Outer Space
National space budgets are not growing rapidly, in part because of changes in the international political and economic environment. No longer is there a space race between the U.S. and the Soviet Union. While it is virtually impossible to value the...