USA TODAY

Founded in September of 1982, USA Today is a national daily newspaper published by Gannett Co., Inc. The paper has a Mon.-Thurs. circulation of over 2 million readers. The Friday edition of the paper has a circulation of over 2.5 million readers.The Editor of USA Today is John Hillkirk.

Articles from Vol. 125, No. 2622, March

Baseball's Bogus Basic Agreement
Eastern Europe collapsed under the chains of socialism and America rejoiced: "Capitalistic free enterprise is our savior!" The U.S., the government, and its people are nothing if not shallow hypocrites, however. The "preach one thing, but do another"...
Beware the Rise of Antibiotic-Resistant Microbes
As bacteria learn to adapt to drugs that once killed them, mankind could be facing a return to the days when even minor infections could turn deadly for lack of effective treatment. Many people can not even remember when nothing could be done to...
Can Companies Survive When the Boss Is the Problem?
You are the Ceo of a $7,000,000 company that shows every sign of moving quickly to an annualized rate of $10,000,000 in the next six months. The signs are good: back orders are growing; unsolicited requests for quotes are up; signals on outstanding...
Can We Coexist with Iran?
The Islamic Republic of Iran engages in many types of unacceptable behavior. According to the State Department's 1996 terrorism reports, Iran is the leading sponsor of terrorism in the world. Author Salman Rushdie, accused of heresy by Iran for his...
Can We Stop Global Warming?
Controlling population growth and cutting down on wasteful consumption of energy and other resources clearly are necessary to reverse the climatic extreme. By the middle of the 21st century, the Earth probably will be warmer than it has been at any...
Death Penalty Is a Deterrent
SEPT. 1, 1995, marked the end of a long fight for justice in New York and the beginning of a new era in our state that promises safer communities, fewer victims of crime, and renewed personal freedom. For 22 consecutive years, my predecessors had...
Fathers & Sons: The Bonding Process
As far as I am concerned, my father was the finest man who ever lived. William Andrew Hanson II was my hero--John Wayne, Audie Murphy, and Joe DiMaggio all rolled into one. He was equal parts friend, mentor, and confidant. We spoke without words and...
Financial Planning Tips for Generation X
Americans in their 20s and early 30s aren't fond of what their generation is called: Generation X, baby busters, post-boomers, the Lost Generation. They also don't like the common image of them as whiny kids in poor-paying jobs. The fact is, they...
Food Forays in the Battle of the Sexes
A young couple goes out to dinner for the first time. The man orders a 16-ounce steak and a beer. The woman pushes salad around on her plate while sipping seltzer with a slice of lime. After they say goodnight, she walks into her apartment, heads...
Immigration and Welfare Reform: Finally, Taxpayers Are Being Considered
"Americans are willing to help those who need it, but have grown increasingly tired of subsidizing non-citizens, the addicted, criminals, and those who simply refuse to work." Welfare hurst people. It hurts those who receive it by creating a culture...
It's Time to Reconsider Global Climate Change Policy
Global warming appears to be yet another example of predicting catastrophe to reshape political decisions and economic outcomes. This is an overused strategy. Indeed, more than five decades ago, political satirist H.L. Mencken observed, "The whole...
Legalization of Narcotics: Myths and Reality
When the high priests of America's political right and left as articulate as the National Review's William F. Buckley and The New York Times' Anthony Lewis peddle the same drug legalization line, it is time to shout caveat emptor--buyer beware. The...
Most Kids Withdraw from Home Life
Parents shouldn't fret about their kids' absence from household life between fifth and 12th grades because it is not likely a reflection of family turmoil, according to a University of Illinois study Reed Larson, professor of psychology and family...
Pandor's Box - American Style
In greek mythology, Pandora was sent to humans as punishment for Prometheus' stealing of fire from the gods. She was entrusted with a box containing all the ills that could beset the world and she opened it. All those ills escaped, but they were accompanied...
Paul Bowles: A Study in Contradictions
If, as former Librarian of Congress Daniel Boorstin wrote, a celebrity is someone who is well-known for his well-knownness, author Paul Bowles has become an anti-celebrity, famous for not being more famous. He has been called "contradictory," "enigmatic,"...
Preventable Calamity: How to Reduce Teenage Pregnancy
All across America, young girls who still are children themselves are bearing children of their own. It is a calamity for these young mothers, because early motherhood denies them opportunities and choices; for their offspring, because most will grow...
Puncturing the "Loose Nukes" Myth
Since the soviet collapse, the American public has been bombarded with the "loose nukes" myth. It maintains that Russian nuclear weapons and materials are leaking to terrorists or rogue states such as Libya, Iran, Iraq, or North Korea. Despite...
Raising Talented Kids Takes Extra Effort
If it takes a village to raise a child, the villagers may need some extra help to raise an exceptionally talented child, suggests Sidney M. Moon, co-director of the Gifted Education Resource Institute at Purdue University and an assistant professor...
Scientific Facts: Compatible with Christian Faith?
One would think the battle between science and Christianity had been resolved long ago. Recent statements by both scientists and theologians belie that thought, however. For instance, Richard Dawkins, an outspoken anti-Christian biologist, wrote,...
Seeking an Answer to "What Is news?"(Column)
As the media move into the 21st century, it might be a good idea to examine an age-old question: What is news? To an old-time city editor, the question alone would be enough to kick you out of the newsroom. What is news? Dog bites man is not news....
Tax Planning Advice for 1997
April 15th is approaching quickly. It is tax time again, and we all are thinking about ways to decrease our 1996 taxes. In reality, now is the time to plan for 1997 taxes; 1996 already is over and there is little we can do to change what has happened...
The Case against the Death Penalty
According to critics, it does not reduce crime, is extraordinarily expensive, actually reduces public safety, is arbitrary in operation, and damages the criminal justice system. On Sept. 1, 1995, New York rejoined the ranks of states imposing...
The Courts vs. the People
One hundred and forty years ago, Chief Justice Roger Taney, in deciding Dred Scott v. Sanford, foolishly assumed that he could construct a judicial solution to the problem of slavery. Taney concluded that Congress was without the power to outlaw slavery...
The Death of Hollywood's Golden Age and the Changing American Character
No child born into pre-World War II America possibly could deny the extraordinary power of film to shape our imagination, influence our expectations of life, give some glimpse of adulthood, and provide a sense of what kind of country we were living...
The Empty Promise of School Vouchers
In early 1996, the appropriations bill for the District of Columbia was held up repeatedly as Senate Republicans sought to use it as a vehicle for introducing an "experimental" plan for tax support of nonpublic schools through tuition vouchers. The...
The Future of Mental Health: Radical Changes Ahead
Over the past 30 years, psychiatry has denigrated and jettisoned the human willpower-coping model and psychotherapy. It claims instead that all character flaws and emotional pains are "diseases," the result of biochemical imbalances of the brain,...
Unmasking the Great Military Readiness Crisis Fraud
The Pentagon's claims concerning American combat forces' lack of preparedness to fulfill their missions proved false, but succeeded in generating Congressional funding when the budgets of other executive branch departments were being cut. Remember...
Unnerving Realism of Ivan Allbright
The artist "enlarged every facial wrinkle, birthmark, and stray hair and captured every blemish and bulge of exposed skin." The son of an artist and the twin of another, Ivan Albright was one of Chicago's greatest and most original painters. He did...
Welfare Pays Better, So Why Work?
"If Congress or state governments are serious about reducing hard-core welfare dependence and rewarding work, the most promising reform is to cut benefit levels substantially." As the debate over welfare reform continues, one goal seems constant...
Welfare Reform: The End of Compassion?
The major threat to welfare reform is from the defenders of the status quo because they have dug-in positions and heavy air support from media interests. These welfare reactionaries say that any attempt to transform welfare will lead to increased...
What's Really Going on with the Economy?
A few years ago, Michael Eisner, president of Walt Disney Corp., earned $200,000,000. Bill Gates, the major stockholder of the software company Microsoft, is worth more than $9,000,000,000. The average salary for the chief executive officers of major...
Year of the Independents
In an age when the commercial entertainment industry steadily is solidifying its grip on the art of the cinema, it frequently is tough to imagine that there actually is an alternative to the hightech, heavily ballyhooed seasonal blockbusters that...