USA TODAY

Founded in September of 1982, USA Today is a national daily newspaper published by Gannett Co., Inc. The paper has a Mon.-Thurs. circulation of over 2 million readers. The Friday edition of the paper has a circulation of over 2.5 million readers.The Editor of USA Today is John Hillkirk.

Articles from Vol. 127, No. 2645, February

Adolescents Need More Calcium to Grow
The amount of calcium adolescents need to achieve maximum bone growth has been determined for the first time by research at Purdue University, West Lafayette, Ind. It shows they require 1,300 milligrams per day--an amount found in four and a half cups...
Americans Mingling Alternative and Traditional Medical Services
Complementary therapies--such as chiropractic, acupuncture, or meditation--are so interwoven in the fabric of American health care today that it no longer may be relevant to draw firm lines between complementary and conventional medicine, researchers...
Attentive Patients Can Drive Safely
Although previous studies have shown that Alzheimer's disease increases a person's risk for automobile accidents, not all individuals with mild dementia exhibit poor driving performance. Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St....
Bacterium, Not Stress, Is the Villain
Once a lifelong condition that affected mostly men, peptic ulcer disease now counts an equal number of women among its victims. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), females as well as males generally develop first onset...
Blood Pressure Drop May Cause Vision Loss
People who take medications to control high blood pressure at bedtime or in excessive amounts may be at increased risk for an eye disorder known as anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (AION) or stroke of the eye. According to Sohan Hayreh, professor...
Compound in Meat May Be Preventative
A common type of fat found in red meats and cheeses may prevent diabetes, according to a research team from Purdue University, West Lafayette, Ind., and Pennsylvania State University, University Park. This information could lead to new drugs to help...
Detecting Colorectal Cancer Spread
About one-third of people who have undergone surgery for colorectal cancer face development of additional tumors. Tests to detect cancer recurrence can give contradictory results, forcing doctors to perform exploratory surgeries that may be too late...
Don't Restrict Youngsters' Fat Intake
Bruce Watkins, professor of lipid chemistry and metabolism, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Ind., and Bernhard Hennig, professor of cell nutrition, University of Kentucky, Lexington, say that youngsters under five are getting too little fat in their...
Focusing on Body Image Dissatisfaction
Future psychological studios of plastic surgery patients need to focus on body image, according to the authors of a historical review of cosmetic surgery patients. "we really don't know what motivates people to seek plastic surgery," admits Linton...
Garlic Prevents Hardening of Aorta
A dose of garlic in the diet may help to prevent hardening of the aorta, the major artery that carries blood from the heart. The aorta hardens naturally with age, but a more elastic aorta is beneficial because it conducts blood smoothly from the heart...
HealthBeat
Longer life spans present challenges for seniors and their dentists. The percentage of older Americans without their natural teeth has dropped from 70 to 40% over the last four decades, notes Kenneth Shay, adjunct associate professor in the School...
How Aspirin Protects against Heart Attacks
Why does simple aspirin use protect some people from heart attacks? Researchers at Ohio State University, Columbus, have traced the mechanism back to a specific genetic factor present on the surface of clotting cells called platelets. The discovery...
How Reliable Are Home HIV Tests?
HIV tests that can be taken at home are good options for individuals who want to know whether they have been infected with the AIDS virus, but shy away from clinics and doctors' offices, indicates Andy Luber, a pharmacist and infectious disease expert...
"Keyhole" Surgery Can Stop Indigestion
For 40 years, Dallas (-I-ex.) physician David Brand felt the burn. The chronic and severe heartburn finally stopped after treatment with "keyhole" surgery. He had a hiatal hernia and a weakened lower esophageal sphincter. A normal sphincter opens to...
Lactose Intolerant? Drink More Milk!
Many people who claim to be lactose intolerant really aren't, maintains Dennis Savaiano, dean of Purdue University's School of Consumer and Family Sciences, West Lafayette, Ind. The problem, he notes, is that dairy foods can be difficult to digest,...
Medicare Choices
If you are covered by Medicare, you face a bewildering array of new plans as the government struggles to put a lid on escalating costs. The Institute of Certified Financial Planners, Denver, Colo., recommends that you take your time evaluating the...
New Procedure to Repair Aneurysms
A minimally invasive procedure for repairing abdominal aortic aneurysms gets people back on their feet sooner--and with fewer complications--than traditional open surgery, according to a national, multi-center study led by Christopher Zarins, chief...
New Tools to Fight Excruciating Agony
A drug derived from the poison of a Philippine sea snail and fiberoptic technology for viewing the spine are providing powerful new tools with which to relieve the suffering of patients with persistent, excruciating pain, the American Society of Anesthesiologists...
Rejuvenation Techniques
Restore a Youthful Appearance With baby boomers approaching their 50s and an increasing number of mature adults enjoying active lifestyles well into their 70s and 80s, it is not surprising that Americans are trying to look as young as they feel,...
Rescue Therapy Stems Tumor Recurrence
Mohs micrographic surgery is a specialized method of skin cancer removal considered to be the "rescue therapy" after other treatments fail. Experts in the procedure say patients should ask their dermatologist or family physician to consider it first...
Secondhand Smoke Adds to Surgical Risk
Medical researchers have established a clear link between secondhand tobacco smoke and serious breathing problems for children who receive general anesthesia. Girls are at greater risk, especially those whose mothers have a lower level of education,...
Seven Steps to a Smoke-Free Life
Prior to the first Surgeon General's Report on Cigarette Smoking in 1964, about half of all American adults lit up. That number has declined over the last three decades, but about one in four adults still smokes. A new seven-step program can help smokers...
Stop Blaming Toads-Virus Is the Cause
Many people will tell you that, if you want to avoid getting warts, you shouldn't touch frogs or toads. This belief in the amphibious cause of common skin warts may be the result of folktales read to small children. While these stories may have provided...
Test Your Feminine Hygiene IQ
Males can skip this story and move on to the next article. If you are female, though, you should be aware that, while it is important to be familiar with your body in general, it becomes especially so at times when a problem arises, such as feminine...
Virtual Reality Training Tools
High-tech virtual reality training tools soon may be available to build and enhance plastic surgeons' skills. "Virtual reality has been available previously, but [our] study shows that, with miniaturization, it can also be used to teach microsurgical...
Vitamin C May Reduce Heart Attack Risk
Moderate daily supplements of vitamin C taken by people with coronary artery disease may be effective in improving the function of blood vessels, preventing the chest pains of unstable angina pectoris, and reducing the risk of heart attack and stroke,...
Why Certain Cancers Spread to Bones
Bones are among the most common places for aggressive breast and prostate cancer to spread, yet other types of cancer may leave this fertile area alone. Why is this so? "Perhaps breast and prostate cancer possess inherent capabilities which not only...
WOMEN DOCTORS Are under Greater Pressure
Women physicians treat just as many patients with complex medical problems as their male counterparts, but carry a heavier burden when it comes to handling psychosocial issues such as depression, anxiety, eating disorders, and "somatization," a condition...