USA TODAY

Founded in September of 1982, USA Today is a national daily newspaper published by Gannett Co., Inc. The paper has a Mon.-Thurs. circulation of over 2 million readers. The Friday edition of the paper has a circulation of over 2.5 million readers.The Editor of USA Today is John Hillkirk.

Articles from Vol. 121, No. 2574, March

Africa: Portrait of a Continent in Crisis
FOR DECADES, Africa has been the forgotten continent--neglected by Westerners, ignored by economic historians, and patronized by politicians. Unfortunately for the development of the continent, policies of the Western governments towards Africa mainly...
Read preview Overview
Baseball Becomes Raceball
RACIST'S SCREAMING RACISM makes for an ugly feeding frenzy. Cincinnati Reds majority owner Marge Schott has uttered ethnic and religiously inflammatory remarks, as well as the ultimate killer word, "nigger." There has been a much-deserved uproar over...
Read preview Overview
Beating the Office Hazard Blues
NEARLY HALF the U.S. labor force--upwards of 50,000,000 people--works in office buildings. The office game is almost all mental, but the physical toll can be great. Emotional stress, so often the precursor to physical ailments, can grow in an office...
Read preview Overview
Bigger Is Not Better: The Virtues of Decentralized Local Government
OLD-LINE manufacturing cities have taken it on the chin in recent years. Just ask officials in Dayton, Ohio. As its metropolitan area grew to almost 1,000,000 people, the central city's share of the regional population declined from more than one-third...
Read preview Overview
Can the U.S. Cope with the Techno-Future?
REMARKABLE ADVANCES in technology rapidly are transforming business and industry all over the globe, and even faster change is coming. The impact will be tremendous, not just on business, but on national economies and social structures as well. Emerging...
Read preview Overview
Ceremony and Ritual: Folk Art of Latin America
SINCE PRE-COLUMBIAN times, folk art in Latin American has been the primary vehicle through which people have expressed their dreams and fears, courted their lovers, amused their children, worshipped their gods, and honored their ancestors. Today, as...
Read preview Overview
Famous Faces by 19th Century Photographer Mathew Brady
WHEN Abraham Lincoln arrived in the nation's capital on Feb. 23, 1861, to prepare for his upcoming inauguration, one of his first stops was the Pennsylvania Avenue gallery of the most famous and prestigious photographer in America-Mathew Brady. It...
Read preview Overview
How to Solve the Health Care Dilemma
PRES. BILL CLINTON'S domestic Rubicon could be the red river of increasing health costs. At his pre-inaugural economic conference, he suggested that radical health care cost control, not pro-growth investment policies, must be the centerpiece of his...
Read preview Overview
India: Rising Asian Economic Superpower
BESET BY ETHNIC CONFLICT again in 1992, India entered American attention by its usual back-door route, through media reports on the extensive poverty and homelessness in cities such as Calcutta and Bombay or religious turmoil among Hindus, Muslims,...
Read preview Overview
Investing in Our Children: A Struggle for America's Conscience and Future
THE 1990S' STRUGGLE is about the U.S.'s conscience and future. Many of the battles will not be as dramatic as Gettysburg or Vietnam or Desert Storm, but they are going to shape this nation's place in the 21st century. Every American in this last decade...
Read preview Overview
It's Time for a New Management System
IN THE PAST CENTURY, America has been transformed into an industrial and economic power that--for all its current problems--is without parallel in world history. One hundred years ago, the U.S. primarily was rural and agrarian. People lived on farms,...
Read preview Overview
Lifestyle 2000: New Enterprise and Cultural Diversity
THE SOCIAL, economic, and political dynamics of a society will depend greatly on its economic system and the wealth accumulation of its citizens. In particular, the diversity and creativity of its population will serve to expand the horizons of those...
Read preview Overview
Limits of Boom-and-Bust Development: Challenge of the Amazon
"WE KNOW that as Brazil goes, so will go the rest of that Latin American continent," said Pres. Richard Nixon in 1971 while lavishing praise on Gen. Emilio Garastazu Medici, perhaps the least charming of Brazil's 20-year parade of military presidents--and...
Read preview Overview
Memories of War: How Vietnam-Era Nurses Are Coping Today
THE EXCELLENT performance of women who served in the Gulf War highlights the important contributions they have made during times of armed conflict. However, it only has been in the past five or six years that scientific and public attention has been...
Read preview Overview
News Must Be More Than Sex and Violence
IT USED TO BE so easy to define what news was. The gruff, growling, white male city editors who dominated American journalism for most of this century knew what news was all about. It was a good story involving sex or violence, kids or dogs, the unusual...
Read preview Overview
Pollution Can Be Controlled with Less Government Regulation
IN MANY RESPECTS, a clean environment is no different from any other desirable commodity. In a world of scarcity, people can increase consumption only by giving up something else. The dilemma they face is choosing the combination of goods that enhances...
Read preview Overview
Rise of "The New Segregation": The "Politics of Difference" Threatens to Produce a Divided Society
THE CIVIL RIGHT's movement of the 1950s and 1960s culminated in the 1964 Civil Rights and 1965 Voting Rights Acts--two monumental pieces of legislation that dramatically have altered the fabric of American life. During the struggle for their passage,...
Read preview Overview
Roadblocks to Reform
MANY HAVE ATTRIBUTED gridlock to divided government, a distinguishing feature of the Reagan-Bush era. With a Democrat now in the White House and that party firmly in control of Congress, the simple conclusion would be that gridlock would end and a...
Read preview Overview
Should We Tax Consumption?
PUBLIC INTEREST in changing the tax system is growing much faster than understanding of the competing proposals. Democrats and Republicans, liberals and conservatives, all have come up with their favorite nominees for tax cuts--the poor, middle class,...
Read preview Overview
Television: The Cyclops That Eats Books
WHAT IS DESTROYING America today is not the liberal breed of one-world politicians, International Monetary Fund bankers, misguided educational elite, or World Council of Churches. These largely are symptoms of a greater disorder. If there is any single...
Read preview Overview
The Fall of Francis Coppola
THE RELEASE of Francis Ford Coppola's latest film, "Bram Stoker's Dracula," for all its box office success, is the last nail in the coffin (the bad pun is the only appropriate metaphor) for a director whose sagging career has been the subject of much...
Read preview Overview
The Pleasures of Paris
WE GAZED SKYWARD from the base of one of its mighty legs. The view was both imposing and dizzying. Rising majestically above us, latticework beams reflecting the golden rays of the sun on a magnificent spring day, the Eiffel Tower seemed official confirmation...
Read preview Overview
The Supreme Court and Capital Punishment: A New Hands-Off Approach
MUCH OF THE constitutional debate surrounding the death penalty concerns its compatibility with the Eighth Amendment's prohibition against the imposition of cruel and unusual punishment. Justice William Brennan, Jr., argued eloquently that the sentence...
Read preview Overview
The Unsettling Resettlement of Vietnamese Boat People
THE RESETTLEMENT of Southeast Asian refugees in Sacramento, Calif., offers a pointed example of the social practices by which new immigrants are shaping the emerging U.S. urban landscape. This reterritorialization has created problems, as well as opportunities,...
Read preview Overview
Time to Cry "Auntie!" (Influence of Women in Society) (Column)
THE OLD EXPRESSION had it that, when one has had enough pressure put on to the point of not being able to take it any longer, it was time to cry "Uncle!" Upon hearing the magic word, the other would release the pressure. Today, however, the more appropriate...
Read preview Overview
Washington's Iron Curtain against East European Exports
IN THE LATE 1940s, the Marshall Plan poured millions of dollars into Denmark, the Netherlands, and other European nations to help them rebuild their dairy industries. Then, in 1951, when they were getting back on their feet, Congress bushwhacked aid...
Read preview Overview
Who Wants a Color-Coordinated, Cross-Cultural Core Curriculum?
NOT SURPRISINGLY, the concept of a core curriculumn has sparked intense debate between liberals and conservatives. The focus of the argument is on DWEMs (Dead White European Males) and whether or not they should make up the core of a curriculum. Famous...
Read preview Overview