USA TODAY

Founded in September of 1982, USA Today is a national daily newspaper published by Gannett Co., Inc. The paper has a Mon.-Thurs. circulation of over 2 million readers. The Friday edition of the paper has a circulation of over 2.5 million readers.The Editor of USA Today is John Hillkirk.

Articles from Vol. 125, No. 2618, November

A Good Worker Is Hard to Find
Plagued by high costs for training and retraining underqualified and unmotivated job applicants many small and mid-size companies are looking for help--or another big corporate layoff--to fill open jobs. A national survey of 838 business owners, conducted...
America Is Being Plagued by an Invasion of "Crazies." (Militias and Moral Decay in the U.S.)
While staring nightly at the 11 o'clock news, have you ever found yourself toying with the thought that Americans are going berserk? The relentless parade of shootings, rapes, robbenes, muggings, and carjackings dig into your soul and eventually nourish...
An American Artist's British Masterpieces
Although he more often is recognized for his colonial portraits, John Singleton Copley's dramatic depictions of contemporary events spearheaded an innovative wave of historical paintings. JOHN SINGLETON COPLEY, well-known as the finest American portraitist...
Bill Clinton - the Richard Nixon of Liberalism
ACADEMICS can be addicted to historical analogies that often run the danger of oversimplification. They can provide insights, which is as much as anyone really can bring to the study of politics. For example, Bill Clinton and Richard Nixon make for...
Children Must Be Protected from the Media's Plague of Pessimism
IN RECENT YEARS, the nation has been torn by fears that immigrants may be bad for America. In April, 1995, however, a major study at the University of Chicago suggested the profoundly depressing possibility that the reverse could be true: America just...
Does the Future Have a Future?
AS SCIENTIST and author Arthur Clark once put it, "The future ain't what it used to be." Our life in the present is fraught with worry about what kind of future we and our children will have. While it once offered hope and purpose, it now triggers...
Games Run the Gamut
This season's crop of games are designed for all ages, with a distinct nostalgic touch. In addition to the memory-trivia versions that have been proliferating in recent years, there is a flashback to one's school cafeteria days that definitely will...
Homophobia Is a Health Hazard
TO A LARGE EXTENT, American society has made gay men and lesbians the brunt of multiple levels of prejudice, with negative assumptions about their morality, trustworthiness, employability, and integrity. (Similar accusations have been made against...
How Will 1996 Tax Law Changes Affect You?
On Aug. 20, Pres. Clinton signed HR 3448, The Small Business Job Protection Act of 1996; on Aug. 21, HR 3103, The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996; and on Aug. 22, HR 3174, The Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity...
Invasion U.S.A. - Hollywood Style
ALTHOUGH THE FLYING SAUCER seems to be the preeminent sci-fi icon buzzing around pop culture these days, I would suggest that a more appropriate emblem for the moment is the time machine, since the recent spate of alien invasion films gives the distinct...
Is Educational Reform a Failure?
Recent months have witnessed more setbacks than gains in the quest to bind high academic standards into schooling and to "reinvent" U.S. education. Reports from the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) indicate that many U.S. students...
It's a Whole New Ballgame
THE GREED GAME in sports has become one of those chicken-and-the-egg quandaries: Has the greed of the players (in the form of outrageous salary demands) made revenue generation a must for franchise owners who hope to field a competitive team while...
Lingering Effects of Marital Arguments
Even hours after husbands and wives have stopped arguing, the battle still may be raging within the woman's body, altering her hormone levels and weakening her immune system to the point where illness could gain a foothold. This discovery, based on...
Making Good Choices from Revised Food Guidelines
The revised Dietary Guidelines for Americans are "a great opportunity for nutrition and health professionals to show people just how easy it is to make good nutrition choices," maintains Doris Derelian, president of the American Dietetic Association...
Meeting the Challenges of the Next American Century
"We can leave America undefended and hope for the best. Or we can deploy the finest minds and the world's most advanced science to ensure that Americans a century from now will have reason to thank us for extending a protective shield over posterity."...
Men and Women in Sports: The Playing Field Is Far from Level
"Why is it that female athletes have to `prove' their heterosexuality, while male athletes automatically are assumed to be straight? I OFTEN HEAR celebrities complain about the mail they receive. There is too much or too little; it's too boring or the...
Nothing like an Old Favorite
This year's movie and television hits invariably will bring a horde of tie-ins to flood the shelves of toy and department stores. By next year, these dolls, action figures, etc. will be relegated to a dusty corner of the closet, discarded and forgotten...
Opportunity, Responsibility, Community: Building a Bridge to the 21st Century
WE ARE just four years from the dawn of a new century. It is a time of tremendous hope, exciting change, and enormous possibility. As we move into the information age and the global economy, I believe the outcome of this fall's election will determine...
Presidential Images: Photographs by George Tames, 1944-74
This pioneering photojournalist "found a way to make images that conveyed information without betraying trust and was rewarded with the friendship of national leaders." George Tames learned to be a photographer the same way he learned about history,...
Red Phoenix Rising? Communist Resurgence in Eastern Europe
Boris Yeltsin may have defeated the communist candidate in 1996's presidential election in Russia, but the party is experiencing a renaissance elsewhere in the former Soviet bloc. The sudden collapse of communism in Eastern and Central Europe gave...
Russian Reform: Possibility or Pipedream?
THE NEWS from Russia these days is perplexing. "Capitalism is working," the international press reports one day, but soon after talks of Russia's "reform muddle." Readers are told that "Things are looking up." then that there is a hopeless "mess in Moscow."...
Separation of Church and State: The Dividing Line Grows Thinner
THOMAS JEFFERSON once wrote: "I have sworn upon the altar of God, eternal hostility against every form of tyranny over the mind of man." These words are carved into the base of the Jefferson Memorial in Washington. Most visitors to the monument believe...
The Decline of Television's Family Hour
Programs shown between 8:00 and 9:00 p.m. and designed for family viewing have been replaced by sexy sitcoms and steamy shows that once used to air later at night. TWO DECADES AGO, an official Family Hour was established for prime-time television. As...
The Difficult Pursuit of Peace
THE COLD WAR is over. The Gulf War ended more than five years ago, though Iraq's Saddam Hussein is stirring again. Even the conflict in the former Yugoslavia is on hold. Yet, peace and the ability to preserve it are more fragile than ever. Why should...
The Employment Act of 1946: Still Working after 50 Years
The legislation created the Council of Economic Advisers to provide information to the president. Since the council is not encumbered by special-interest baggage, it serves as a proxy for the public interest. The first half-century of experience under...
The Supreme Court Refuses to Confront HIV/AIDS
SINCE THE FIRST official recognition of AIDS in 1981, nearly 500,000 people in the U.S. have developed the disease. About 40,000 individuals die of AIDS-related consequences each year, and another 1,000,000 or more are infected with HIV, but remain...
To Discipline Kids, Follow Simple Rules
Parents hear all kinds of discipline advice, not only from experts, but from friends, relatives, and sometimes even strangers. One book stresses positive reinforcement, while another stresses "tough love." Aunt Sadie thinks you should spank, while...
Why Ordinary Americans like Daytime Talk Shows
The daytime talk show is under attack by politicians, clergy, sponsors, critics, and any self-styled moral leader looking for an easy cause. People such as William Bennett, the former Secretary of Education, whose best-selling book helps parents teach...
Women in the Workplace: Making Progress in Corporate America
The "glass ceiling" is developing cracks as senior levels of management are becoming less male-dominated. Have women made it into the corner office? As America moves through the 1990s into the 21st century, are women finally represented at all levels...