USA TODAY

Founded in September of 1982, USA Today is a national daily newspaper published by Gannett Co., Inc. The paper has a Mon.-Thurs. circulation of over 2 million readers. The Friday edition of the paper has a circulation of over 2.5 million readers.The Editor of USA Today is John Hillkirk.

Articles from Vol. 122, No. 2579, August

Bird Fossils Provide New Clues
Bird fossils that date back 70,000,000 years found in the Antarctic region may provide new insights into how modern birds evolved. Discovered by Purdue University researcher Bill Zinsmeister and Francisco Mussel of the Instituto Antartico Argentino...
Byzantine Ghost Town Found in Egypt
A team of University of Chicago archaeologists working in Egypt has discovered what is believed to be the remains of a major goldmining operation for the Byzantine Empire. The Byzantine period was a transitional time between the fall of the Roman Empire...
Clinton's Style Reflects the Times
Pres. Clinton is a product of his constituency. "Ten years ago, no one would have listened to Bill Clinton. But in 1993, he's saying and doing things that people want in a leader," indicates Chester A. Schriesheim, a University of Miami management...
Counterfeiting Costs Companies Billions
Counterfeiting of goods is taking a devastating toll, creating losses in revenue to corporations, taxes by governments, jobs in many industry sectors, and quality integrity in the minds of consumers, warns Robin A. Rolfe, executive director, International...
Diversity Programs Cause Headaches
Have America's efforts to manage a diverse workplace kept pace with the nation's rapidly changing workforce demographics? According to a survey by the Society of Human Resource Management and Commerce Clearing House, almost 70% of the companies reported...
Doctor-Patient Communication in Critical Condition
Much of the attention on health care reform has focused on providing everyone access to basic medical care. As patient caseloads increase, though, it will become critical for doctors and patients to communicate more efficiently and effectively, according...
Evaluating Weight Loss Programs
Because weight control is big business, countless numbers of bogus quick weight loss plans are available. Kay Stanfill, a registered dietician at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, offers some advice on how to determine the truth about...
Handling Kids with Attention Disorders
The nation's special education teachers, faced with an ever-increasing number of children with severe behavior problems, have found that traditional methods of disciplining youngsters simply won't work with some of their charges. Cheryl McNeil,...
How Cocaine Use Affects Violence
Contrary to earlier findings, research reveals that there is little connection between the way drug users ingest cocaine--by smoking, injecting, or snorting--and their levels of violent behavior. "Most of the previous studies showed that the more intense...
How to Avoid Quacks and Cure-Alls
Because health is at the forefront of concerns among many older Americans, they are seen as much more vulnerable to unorthodox treatments, often affording quacks an opportunity to make money off seniors. Such "miracle cures" or treatments usually are...
How to Discourage Burglars
Are you packing up and going on vacation? Before you shut the door and leave your troubles behind, make sure that your home doesn't look abandoned and available for a burglary. "Keeping up an illusion of occupancy is perhaps the most significant preventative...
"Hunger in Soul" Dooms Dieters
The standard approaches to weight loss--encouraging more will power, liquids or grapefruit only, low-fat or starvation diets, even serious programs incorporating behavior modification--all too often fail when a person is trying to conquer a lifelong...
It's Really Easy to Damage Your Teeth
Each year, many people suffer damage to their teeth and gums, not as a result of traumatic injury, but because of poor dental hygiene or by putting things in their mouths that do not belong there. Doug Hall, assistant professor of periodontics at the...
National Data Network: A Bumpy Ride
Pres. Clinton's plan to create an information network linking every U.S. home, business, classroom and library may have vast economic and sociological impact, but the road to the network may be paved with problems. "Before the nation goes on-line,...
New Battery for Electric Cars
The future of the electric automobile depends of the development of a practical battery with a useful range, something that so far has eluded engineers. One using nickel metal hydride may be the answer. "This is a new battery, which is non-toxic, environmentally...
Nursing Home Care Demand Increasing
The graying of America places increasing demands on the shrinking number of physicians willing to care for nursing home patients, according to a University of Missouri-Columbia study. More than 1,500,000 people live in the nation's 20,000 nursing homes....
Orbiting Trash Can Be a Peril
While debate is fierce concerning Earth-bound ecological issues, there exists a far greater willingness among policymakers to deal with the growing problem of garbage in space. According to a survey by Silvana Camboni, an environmental sociologist...
Part-Time Students Being Shortchanged
Rapid growth in the number and proportion of part-time college students over the last two decades may require an overhaul of the financial aid system, according to a report from the American Council on Education. Despite their increasing presence on...
Putting an End to Food Fights
Irreconcilable differences in the kitchen are becoming commonplace as health-conscious and meat-and-potatoes types battle it out to maintain their respective turfs. "Today, more and more, we're. seeing people with very definite opinions of what they...
Scandalous Youth Are Nothing New
Urban youth were the creators of style even in 16th- and 17th-century London, according to Stanford University social historian Paul Seaver. Young London apprentices of that era "behaved very much like modern urban youth," shocking their elders with...
Search for Birth Parents: Disappointment Ahead?
It seems to be almost expected these days that an adopted child eventually will try to seek out his or her birth parents. However, while television programs and newspapers occasionally profile happy reunions, the reality can be quite different, maintains...
Spanking Sends the Wrong Signal
Spanking children for wrongdoing has been eliminated from most schools. With child abuse so much on people's minds, many parents are refraining from spanking their offspring at home, as well. In this increasing trend of not picking up the paddle to...
Standards May Be Counterproductive
Anticipatory government standards aimed at improving a country's position in high-technology races may have the opposite effect, suggests Marie Thursby, professor of economics in Purdue University's Krannert School of Management. Setting such standards...
Teens Still Being Struck by Parents
Adolescents may be on the threshold of adulthood, but, for many teens, one holdover from their childhood remains. Murray Straus, professor of sociology, University of New Hampshire, points out that at least half still are hit by their parents. Corporal...
The Annual Statement That Americans Need, but Don't Get
If your bank, pension plan, and stockbroker can send you annual statements, why not the Social Security Administration?, asks Stanford University economist John Shoven. Unlike their Canadian counterparts, the vast majority of American workers have...
War on Drugs Lacks Focus and Direction
The Federal government should step back f rom its costly and long-running war on drugs and consider more carefully what it is trying to accomplish, according to Anna Celeste Burke, assistant professor of social work, Ohio State University. "It often...