USA TODAY

Founded in September of 1982, USA Today is a national daily newspaper published by Gannett Co., Inc. The paper has a Mon.-Thurs. circulation of over 2 million readers. The Friday edition of the paper has a circulation of over 2.5 million readers.The Editor of USA Today is John Hillkirk.

Articles from Vol. 132, No. 2699, August

"A Nation at Risk" Spurs Two Decades of Failure. (Education Reform)
Twenty years after the historic "A Nation at Risk" report set off a nearly continuous wave of education reforms, most of those goals were never met. Maris Vinovskis, Bentley Professor of History, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, who advised the Department...
Antibioterrorism Efforts May Bolster Public Health System. (Homeland Security)
In 2001, anthrax-laced letters killed five people. In 2003, the SARS epidemic revealed that Mother Nature can be a nasty bioterrorist herself. Future biological attacks are unlikely to announce themselves with letters saying, "This is anthrax--take...
CEO Departures Down in 2002. (Management)
Does chief executive officer stability indicate an end to corporate upheaval resulting in part from governance issues? CEO departures in 2002 took a sudden downward turn as companies announced 749 during the year, 19% fewer than the 929 recorded in...
Children May Be at Risk as Pedestrians. (Safety)
While many parents and children may believe their neighborhood is a friendly place to walk, a survey conducted by the National Safe Kids Campaign found that nearly 60% of the adults and youngsters encountered serious hazards on their way to school....
Columbine Coverage Shook the Nation. (Mass Media)
With the recent passing of the fourth anniversary of the Columbine school shooting, a new study finds that the media's coverage bred a culture of fear nationwide that defies logic. "After the Columbine media coverage, the nation became terrified that...
Electronic Teaching Spurs Skepticism. (Education)
University educators largely extol the wonders of teaching through technology, but skeptics question whether something is lost when professors and lecturers rely too heavily on electronic media or when interaction with students takes place remotely--in...
Food-Origin Labeling Benefits Everyone. (Federal Regulations)
At a time of rising concern over food security, public demand is growing for information about where food originates. "There's nothing new about food imports, but there is a lot of interest by a lot of people about where the food they consume comes...
Freedom: Norman Rockwell's Vermont Years. (Focus on America)
After artist Norman Rockwell left the social swirl of New Rochelle, New York, he described moving to pastoral Vermont as having "fallen into Utopia," as the peaceful enclave of Arlington offered him a simpler, quieter life and the comfort and connection...
Industrial Revolution Linked to Evolution. (Economics)
It took an evolutionary leap in the human species to help trigger the change from centuries of economic stagnation to a state of sustained economic growth, according to the first theory that integrates evolutionary biology and economics. "Until now,...
Is Your Company Supporting Terrorism? (Corporate Charity)
You want to be a good corporate citizen, but it's difficult these days. Once upon a time, you encouraged employees to give to worthy nonprofits, matched their contributions, received a nice tax break, and trusted that you were helping make the world...
Kindergarten Transition Made Easier. (Youth Development)
Learning to walk and how to dress one's self are big steps for a youngster, but entering kindergarten is one of the most pivotal times in a young child's life. Kansas State University assistant professor of elementary education Lori Norton-Meier gives...
New Software Alleviates Traffic. (Transportation)
The same in-road detectors that control traffic lights and monitor traffic could soon respond quicker to traffic jams, thanks to software developed by Benjamin Coifman, assistant professor of electrical engineering and civil and environmental engineering,...
Not Asking for Help Is Top Networking Mistake. (Business)
Need a favor? Mum's not the word. More than one-third of workers surveyed say not asking people for help is the top networking mistake. Failing to keep in touch with professional acquaintances ranked second, with one-quarter of the response. The survey...
Prepaid Plans Show Signs of Trouble. (Tuition)
It was beginning to look too good for families saving for college, and maybe it was. After the bear market battered accounts invested in the popular tax-favored 529 college savings plans, which operate much like a mutual fund, families began taking...
Pres. Bush's Plan Encourages Savings. (Investment)
We've all heard the talk about how consumer spending will boost the economy. How about consumer savings? That's the route taken by Pres. Bush's proposed retirement plan. Consumer savings ultimately will lead to economic recovery in the U.S., contend...
Proposed Legislation Hurts Head Start. (Preschool Programs)
The national movement to change the Federal preschool program would do more harm than good, according to James Elicker, a professor of child development at Purdue University, West Lafayette, Ind., and former Head Start teacher. "Head Start is not broken,...
Renewed Questions about Internships. (Job Market)
With the allegation in a recently published book that Pres. John F. Kennedy retained a college student intern as a traveling companion, once again the focus is on the issue of internships. "It is likely that with all the publicity, parents will be...
Senators' Approval Ratings Unpredictable. (Polls)
Although elected officials may attempt to influence public approval ratings as they look toward reelection, their own tactical maneuvers do not have as much effect as factors beyond their control, a recent study points out. Demographics such as their...
Teaching Adult Children the Facts of Life. (Finances)
Your children are grown, but they still may be kids when it comes to managing their money. Perhaps they have returned home to live with you because they can't afford to be on their own, or they're living on their own but are struggling financially...
The Human Comedy: Portraits by Red Grooms. (Museums)
In reconciling the sophistication of high art with the naivete of folk art and the humor of the cartoonist, Red Grooms helped redefine the concept of portraiture at the end of the 20th century. The artist, working within a centuries-old tradition,...
Tire/pavement Tests to Pinpoint Road Noise. (Automotive Technology)
Innovative types of pavements will help reduce traffic noise on future highways, suggests research using a new, one-of-a-kind machine custom-made for Purdue University, West Lafayette, Ind. "This work will eventually lead to a more precise understanding...
Trade Patterns Predict Financial Earthquakes. (Stock Market)
The stock market has its share of shakeups, but who would guess that large movements in this man-made system adhere to a similar pattern of predictability as earthquake magnitudes? After analyzing four years of data from the world financial markets,...
Ways to Avoid Job-Hunting Burnout. (Unemployment)
When people think of burnout, they tend to think of overworked employees, but those putting in long hours on the job hunt also may be affected, notes Tracey Turner, executive director of The Creative Group, a specialized staffing firm placing creative,...
When Client Requests Go beyond the Pale. (Workplace)
Most advertising agencies aim to please their clients, but some requests go beyond the call of duty. The Creative Group, a specialized staffing service providing marketing, advertising, creative, and web professionals on a project basis, recently surveyed...
Why Women Drop out of Engineering Programs. (Higher Education)
Why do many women drop out of engineering majors? A comprehensive study finds that the reason is not lack of academic ability, but a discouraging academic climate and women not feeling part of a larger engineering community. Females who succeed in...