USA TODAY

Founded in September of 1982, USA Today is a national daily newspaper published by Gannett Co., Inc. The paper has a Mon.-Thurs. circulation of over 2 million readers. The Friday edition of the paper has a circulation of over 2.5 million readers.The Editor of USA Today is John Hillkirk.

Articles from Vol. 125, No. 2624, May

Academic Medical Centers: Lean Times Ahead
Congress is proposing that the government should reduce its role in financing medical education and that a greater part of the burden should be bourne by private health care companies which benefit fron such training. Since the demise of Pres. Clinton's...
A Model for the 21st Century
As we approach the millennium, the other 49 states can learn much from Michigan's experience in cutting both taxes and welfare. "It's the economy, stupid." The slogan is as fresh today as it was during the 1992 presidential campaign that cost Republicans...
An Urgent Need for a Strong Missile Defense
"It is only a matter of time before rogue nations such as Iraq and Libya obtain the means to threaten American cities with ballistic missiles armed with chemical, biological, or nuclear weapons." In January, 1996, when Pres. Clinton delivered his...
Baby on the Go
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Can We Break the Pattern of the Criminal Lifestyle?
". . . Keeping violent inmates imprisoned will reduce the number of victims and lower the cost of street crime." Crime control policies are failing, despite optimistic statistics to the contrary. Crime control refers to the use of imprisonment as...
Cleaning Up a Messy Spring
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Earth's Last Gasp?
". . . Entrenched special interests,, such as the coal and oil industries, can be expected to use every tool at their disposal to fight sensible climate policies, regardless of the broad-scale benefits for the economy and the environment." When...
Electronic Money and Banking: What Should Government's Role Be?
"Congress and the executive branch must work together to monitor privacy issues, the security of electronic transfers, consistent standards, and public acceptance." One of the duties of the House Monetary Policy Subcommittee is the oversight and...
Evaluating Your Investment Strategy
If the investment gods have been with you, then you probably are feeling pretty good. Stock prices in particular had another strong year in 1996, with the Standard & Poor's 500 up 22.96% and the Dow up 30.4%. Yet, do you know how well your investments...
Fabulous Jewelry from the House of Cartier
Louis Cartier's innovative designs were "rendered spectacularly in platinum, gold, enamel, and precious stones." A major exhibition of the art of jeweler Louis Cartier--tracing a progression of design styles from the opulence of the turn of the century...
From Cradle to Grave: Measuring Products' Environmental Impact
Does the convenience of plastic containers, polystyrene packaging, disposable diapers, and other late-20th-century advancements outweigh the pollution they cause and their nonbiodegradability? A few years ago, the nation was convulsed by campaigns...
Gardening Time
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Greed Makes the Sports World Go 'Round
Soaring player salaries and pricey tickets may be the most complained about aspects of the greed game now running rampant in the world of sports, but they are by no means the only ones. When big bucks are at stake, sensibilities seem to go right out...
Hot off the Presses: Pseudo Facts, Opinion, and Fantasy
At a party the other day, a young woman was railing against the media, saying they were corrupt and nothing they said on television, in the newspapers, or in magazines could be trusted. She was asked if she read a daily newspaper. She vehemently said...
How Much Do You Know about Pasta?
True or false: Pasta must be fully drained of all cooking water before serving. Tomato sauce is appropriate for all pasta shapes. Always rinse pasta are cooking to eliminate any starch that can cause it to stick together. If you answered true for any...
How Safe Are Auto Races?
Those who have watched auto racing know that much of the thrill comes from its apparent danger. In a sport where high speeds and sharp curves leave crowds on the edge of their seats, few realize that spectators ultimately require more medical attention...
Inflation: The Rules Have Changed
Business reality will continue to keep prices in check, regardless of where the Fed chooses to take interest rates. The U.S. economy continues to thrive, and inflation is not raging out of control. Producer prices are rising at an annual rate of...
Is There a Cure for America's Gambling Addiction?
For the first time in decades, there is a real battle over gambling policy. Americans are familiar with the nation's major addictions: narcotics, alcohol, and tobacco. Society has spent countless millions of dollars warning about these substances,...
Make Kids Partners in Good Behavior
What father hasn't raised his voice at an out-of-control four-year-old? What mother hasn't grabbed a youngster by the shoulders to keep him or her from running into the street? Most parents at some point correctly use what George Scarlett, assistant...
Migration and Security Are Interrelated
No one knows how many international migrants there are. The head of the Geneva-based International Organization for Migration ventured an estimate of 120,000,000 in 1994--about two percent of the world's population. Given events in Africa, the numbers...
Parity: The New Buzzword in Mental Health
Newly enacted legislation guarantees that physical ailments and mental illnesses now will receive equal insurance coverage, in effect legitimatizing all psychiatric diagnoses. If a Camel is a horse put together by a committee, then the mental health...
Persian Gulf Time Bomb: America's Risky Commitment
The bombing that killed 19 U.S. troops in Drahan, Saudi Arabia, was one consequence of the high-profile military presence in the region, and there is great potential for similar attacks in the future. The 1990 Iraqi invasion of Kuwait was a watershed...
Petty Scandals and Small Ideas
There is much lamenting among the chattering class that politics has become simultaneously nasty and boring. How Newt Gingrich's convoluted use of tax-exempt foundations to propagate the faith violated the IRS code is a total muddle to the average...
Professional Development Schools Can Revitalize Teacher Education
Educators finally are recognizing that hands-on, supervised field experiences are better preparation for prospective teachers than "book knowledge" taught in college classrooms. Sometimes, stupid ideas persist in spite of common wisdom to the contrary....
Public Schools, Religion, and Public Responsibility
". . . Children whosefamilies practice any of the world religions other than Christianity either see them given passing, less significant regard or ignored entirely [in the classroom]." There is an old joke that can be heard in faculty lounges around...
Representation without Taxation
"For or imposing taxes on us without our consent...." With these eight words, Thomas Jefferson made tax protest an integral part of the Declaration of Independence. He was responding to King George III, who levied taxes on the colonists, but denied...
Rise & Fall of the Surgeon General: The Nation Wasn't Ready for Joycelyn Elders' Blunt Messages about Sexuality
The nation wasn't ready for Joycelyn Elders' blunt messages about sexuality. After Joycelyn Elder's resignation in December, 1995, the U.S. had no Surgeon General throughout 1996. How could the public and the media go from decrying the right and...
Television Is Losing Its Largest Viewing Audience
Americans over the age of 50 are beginning to tune out because programming is too violent, vulgar' boring, youth-oriented, and insulting to their intelligence. A study conducted by the Primelife Advisory Network (PLAN) concluded that today's television...
The Glory of Byzantium
A stunning exhibition at New York's Metropolitan Museum of Art "demonstrates the richness of Middle Byzantine culture through many of the finest examples of its artistic heritage, revealing the religious, aesthetic, and cultural influences that flowed...
The Perpetual Pursuit of Power
The word "power" seems to leap off the page on its own. It radiates strength and control. Humans always have had a fascination for it, whether in muscle cars, computers, explosions, or the power that personal wealth and/or high political office brings....
This Art's a Steel
Most people's conception of art is fairly stereotyped: Painters work with brushes, while sculptors wield hammers and chisels. Obviously, they haven't met Barrett DeBusk. This Ft. Worth, Tex.-based sculptor's medium is cold forged steel, and the instruments...
Tips for Choosing the Right Cruise Ship
There currently are 35 cruise lines setting sail for destinations around the globe, offering hundreds of itineraries to the Caribbean, Alaska, Europe, Asia. Africa, and Antarctica. With 16 new ships expected to enter the market over the next two years....