USA TODAY

Founded in September of 1982, USA Today is a national daily newspaper published by Gannett Co., Inc. The paper has a Mon.-Thurs. circulation of over 2 million readers. The Friday edition of the paper has a circulation of over 2.5 million readers.The Editor of USA Today is John Hillkirk.

Articles from Vol. 125, No. 2626, July

A Chill Settles over Investigative Journalism
Nellie Bly and Annie Laurie did it. So did Walter Cronkite, Gloria Steinem, Carol Lynn Mithers, the Miami Herald, the Chicago Sun-Times, and "60 Minutes." In fact, some of the best investigative reporters in the history of journalism did it for the...
Big League Bigotry Comes Full Circle
The politically correct police -- in this case, black professional athletes and their enablers, the liberal sporting press -- are at it again. They blatantly are playing the race card in the wake of the season-long celebration marking the 50th anniversary...
Crash
This year witnessed the reappearance of two of the motion picture industry's most contentious and provocative directors, David Lynch and David Cronenberg. The two Davids came from the margins of cinema, where they built large cult followings, and...
Cutting the Budget: There's Got to Be a Better Way
Voting to approve th general idea of a balanced budget is a fine start on the path of fiscal sensibility, but only a start. The really tough job is ahead -- to identify the specific spending cuts that should be made to attract sufficient public support...
Democracy and Religion Are Not Incompatible
America is a nation unique in the history of the world. It is not the product of an accident or evolution. In spite of its tenuous connection to Great Britain, it is not a natural extension of an empire. America literally is, in the words of 17th-century...
Do You Know Who You Are Hiring?
The doorbell rang, and Elizabeth Harrison went to answer it. Looking through the peephole, she noticed a familiar face. It was neither a friend nor an acquaintance, but a man who had been in her house just days before. Opening the door, she allowed...
End of the Line for Amtrak Subsidies?
In 1970, Congress created Amtrak, the National Passenger Railroad, as a publicly owned for-profit company. A quarter-century later, Amtrak remains heavily dependent on public subsidy. Taxpayers contributed more than $1,000,000,000 to Amtrak in 1995...
First-Time Home Buyers: Be Cautious
If you have been considering the purchase of a home, the deal of a lifetime -- or at least of the decade -- literally might be around the corner. Reasonable mortgage rates and stable home prices in most parts of the U.S. are combining to make the...
Hispanics Pursue the American Dream
The more than 21,000,000 Hispanics now living in the U.S. rapidly are becoming the nation's largest minority group. Some demographers already can see the day when one of three Americans will be of Hispanic descent. Will this mean a divided nation...
How Accurate Is Media Coverage of Attention Deficit Disorder?
There has been a recent boomlet in the print and electronic media in stories raising serious questions about the diagnosis and treatment of attention deficit disorder (ADD) or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Many of these reports...
How Much Do You Know about Nutrition?
You may think you know how healthy your eating habits are, but do you? To find out, take this quiz prepared by the National Center for Nutrition and Dietetics, Chicago, Ill. You may be surprised at the results. 1. A poor eating style has been linked...
Is It Possible to Rescue Sub-Saharan Africa?
The 46 nations that comprise Sub-Saharan Africa arguably are the most troubled countries of the Third World. All of the problems that beset developing nations exist there in their most debilitating form. These largely are attributable to rapid population...
Meet the New Majority: The "Leave Us Alone" Coalition
The old Republican coalition of northerners, big business, farmers, and professionals has given way to a modern coalition of individuals and groups who share a common political goal: They all want to be left alone by the government. This "Leave...
Needed: A New Social Contract with Science
We live in a time of great challenges Wand opportunities, one in which scientists are tremendously lucky and privileged to be able to indulge their passions for science and simultaneously provide something useful to society. With this privilege, of...
Pablo Picasso: The Early Years
On OCT. 25, 1881, Pablo Diego Jose Francisco de Paula Juan Nepomuceno Maria de los Remedios Crispin Crispiniano Santisma Trinidad was born to Jose Ruiz Blasco and Maria Picasso Lopez in Malaga, Spain. He was called Pablo Ruiz Picasso, but by 1901...
Police Department Efforts to Deter Sexual Harassment
Police Departments across the nation have been taking a beating in civil rights lawsuits filed against them. These suits are not by members of the public alleging the use of excessive force, unreasonable searches and seizures, or reckless high-speed...
Poor Circulation May Cause Baldness
A link exists between the lack of oxygen in the cells of the scalp and male pattern baldness, according to a study by plastic surgeon Steven L. Ringler, Butterworth Hospital, Grand Rapids, Mich. "Hair requires oxygen to grow. When circulation is inadequate,...
Preparing Financially for Hard Times
Layoffs remain a hard fact of life for many employees, even in good times. You may not be able to avoid receiving a pink slip, but there is plenty you can do to prepare financially for one, suggests the institute of Certified Financial Planners, Denver,...
Public Education's Intractable Problems
The situation in elementary and secondary public education in this country is little short of desperate. The schools' physical plants are crumbling, but citizens, rebelling against suffocating taxes, refuse to vote additional monies for them. ...
Solving the Mysteries of Sleep
Rip Van Winkle slept for 20 years, but many individuals would give anything just to sleep peacefully through the night. According to the National Commission on Sleep Disorders Research, approximately 40,000,000 Americans have a chronic sleep disorder,...
Stores Build a Better Mousetrap
You walk into a grocery store to buy milk, which is located in a cooler on the far wall. As you hurry down the aisle past bags of cookies, your imagination conjures up childhood memories of freshly dunked chocolate chip cookies turning soft and chewy...
Taking the Anxiety out of Paying for College
The cost of higher education has been rising sharply for the past 25 years. The General Accounting Office (GAO) reported in 1996 that average tuition at public universities has soared since 1980 by 234%, much faster than earnings and general inflation....
The Albanian Crisis and the Balkan Tinderbox
Albanians, emerging from a half-century of discipline and sacrifice, just were beginning to learn Western ways of self-indulgence when the only capitalist bubble most had known -- a pervasive pyramid scheme -- burst. The government of Sali Berisha,...
The Audition: New Trend in Hiring
The classical approach to acquiring and filling the myriad of semi-professional and professional positions available in today's workplace no longer works. For employers, it is time-consuming, costly, and, in many instances, inaccurate and fraught...
The Case against Capital Confiscation
If Thomas Jefferson thought taxation without representation was oppressive, he should see how bad it is with representation. According to the Tax Foundation, if the average middle-income wage earner's 1997 salary, starting from Jan. 1, went to pay...
The Republicans' Agony of Governing
From 1969 to 1993, the Republicans were the presidential party and the Democrats the Congressional party. Republican presidents Richard Nixon, Ronald Reagan, and George Bush made their major imprints in foreign policy. In domestic policy, they could...
Tough Choices: Facing the Challenge of Food Scarcity
The signs of a new era in the world food economy are unmistakable. The old formula that was so spectacularly successful in expanding food production for nearly a half-century -- combining more and more fertilizer with higher-yielding varieties --...
What to Do When Your Kids Don't Want to Go Back to School
Most parents understand how difficult it can be to get their offspring out of bed in the morning and off to school. After a long summer of sleeping in and enjoying days by the pool and nights playing Super Nintendo, attending classes doesn't sound...