USA TODAY

Founded in September of 1982, USA Today is a national daily newspaper published by Gannett Co., Inc. The paper has a Mon.-Thurs. circulation of over 2 million readers. The Friday edition of the paper has a circulation of over 2.5 million readers.The Editor of USA Today is John Hillkirk.

Articles from Vol. 126, No. 2630, November

A Pair of New IRA Strategies
The passage of the Small Business Job Protection Act of 1996 created, a significant new Individual Retirement Account (IRA). The Savings Incentive Match Plan (SIMPLE) IRA retirement plan is designed to help employees working for smaller businesses...
Avoiding Words That Hurt
OVER THE PAST DECADE, whenever I have lectured on the powerful, and often negative, impact of words, I have asked audiences if they can go for 24 hours without saying any unkind words about or to anybody. Invariably, a minority of listeners raise...
Coping with the Season of Temptation
In the summer and fall, people's senses are deluged with the best foodstuffs available. Not only are they awash in fresh fruits and vegetables, they have the health industry's blessing to consume at will and never mind moderation. Then comes the...
Domestic Violence Can Be Cured
Imagine this scenario: You are a woman walking on a street in your community this month. You file a report with the police again, although you really don't know why you bother. They know who has been perpetrating these assaults on you, but do little...
Don't Let Holiday Stress Get You Down
When the holidays get to be too much and all you want to do is crawl under a rock until the new year is well under way, Suzanne Bartle-Haring, supervisor of the Marriage and Family Therapy Clinic at Ohio State University, Columbus, wants you to know...
Downsizing Government: A Historical Perspective
From Thomas Jefferson's crusade against centralization of power through post-World War II attempts, to prune bureaucracy, efforts to cut the size of the national government have been short-lived. In recent years, the size and role of government have...
Electric Utility Reform: Who's Watching out for Consumers?
Part of being an American means having the freedom to choose where, when, and how to spend one's money. Whether buying essential items or the luxuries of life, the free market provides those choices. Companies fight for business by keeping prices...
Forging a Political Agenda in Good Economic Times
For the children of mid-century America who grew up against a background of permanent crisis--war, cold war, economic uncertainties--tranquility seems against the laws of nature. If times were prosperous at home, there usually was an international...
Freedom of Speech, Hurt Feelings, and Economic Loss(libel Laws and Food safety)(Column)(Brief Article)
What do strawberry growers, cattle raisers, and anti-child pornography activists have in common? They all want to limit what you say and how and when you say it. The newest wrinkle is referred to as "the adverse economic effects" of free speech....
Health Care at the Crossroads
During the debate over health care reform, the worry expressed about a bureaucratized system was that the quality of care would be worse than it had been. Little did anyone think that quality would become a concern without health care reform. As the...
Helping Children Combat Holiday Commercialism
Christmas lists seem to start earlier and get longer every year. To make it even worse, as children grow, so does the price tag of their desired gifts. Instead of a $5 action figure, they may want the latest designer clothes or expensive electronics....
Hollywood Suffers from Lack of Imagination
Rather than taking a chance on original screenplays, the film industry attempts to play it safe financially by working with proven material--sequels, imitations of his movies, big-screen adaptations of TV programs, remakes, and re-releases. MORE...
How to Make the Most of Two Paychecks
Do you ever feel that even though you have two paychecks in the family. you're not getting ahead? Your suspicions may be right. Recent studies have found that more than half of a second paycheck may go to the very act of earning that paycheck--child...
How to Succeed in the Global Marketplace
Getting ahead "requires patience, commitment, and an open-minded approach to how industries work and consumers think in other cultures." During the past decade, the distinctions between foreign and domestic companies have become increasingly irrelevant...
Human Rights and International Business
In the midst of Southeast Asia's recent financial crisis, Malaysian Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad pointed an accusatory finger at American money speculators as a primary source of the problem. He implied that one or more of them had a political...
In Defense of Affirmative Action
WHEN THE DEBATE over affirmative action in higher education exploded, my open support surprised many. My personal view about using race, ethnicity, and sex among the factors in student admissions has put me at odds with many, including the majority...
Is There a Need for Electric Utility Reform?
The rollback of regulations meant to protect consumers from "monopolistic industries"--or to protect "monopolistic industries" from competition, depending on how you look at it--has been proceeding apace for two decades. The trucking, railroad, airline,...
"Lock 'Em Up and Throw Away the Key": A Policy That Won't Work
Americans no longer build soaring cathedrals that stir people's souls. Instead, they build countless grim prisons that smother hope. It is a depressing trade-off. A single mean, bleak prison cell, with its thin mattress, basic plumbing, 60-watt...
Machine Flaws Make Voting Difficult
The design of some voting machines may make it needlessly difficult for people to cast ballots on Nov. 5, according to Susan King Roth, associate professor of industrial, interior, and visual communication design, Ohio State University, Columbus....
Medicare Funding for Medical Education: A Waste of Money?
By picking up the tab for training doctors, the government is making taxpayers pay instead of private industry having to bear the expense, as it should. Medicare, the government's medical plan for senior citizens, is an ongoing political hot potato....
Modern Materialism Catches Up with Papua New Guinea
Perhaps the most important clues about what modernization has meant to Papua New Guinea are being unearthed by linguists. Some have noted that, until very recently, the indigenous peoples were so proud of their collective individuality, or clan distinctiveness,...
Moral and Ethical Issues for the New Millennium
Cloning is just the latest conflict between scientific endeavors and religious precepts. The next century undoubtedly will bring further clashes between moralists and revolutionary idea. Years ago, a radio program based on H.G. Wells' The War of...
My, How Things Have Changed!
THE FRENCH have a saying that "The more things change, the more they remain the same." Yet, in our personal and everyday world, things do change--some for the best, some for the worse. For example, aging is irreversible and brings with it the illnesses...
Portraits by Renoir
The pictures of Pierre Auguste Renoir reflect a vision both harmonious and joyous and seem to transport viewers out of themselves by presenting an improved, more brilliant version of the world around them. The appeal of these works goes beyond the...
Recycling Organic Waste
Most of the world's cultivated food passes through human beings, so it is no surprise that human waste is a trove of nutrients and organic matter. Harvesting this material for agriculture is a natural way to close an organic loop; indeed, Chinese...
Sex Addiction: Who Should Be Blamed for Lack of Self-Control?
Psychiatrists, the media, and the Internet all are helping to feed Americans' obsession with sex. Philadelphia suburbanites were shocked and abuzz with disbelief when the strangling of a neighbor hit the newspapers. She was a beautiful, vibrant lawyer...
Taking the "Voodoo" out of Supply Side Economics
"Data from the Reagan presidency, the last time supply side economics actually was applied, confirms that tax rate reductions were followed by significant improvements in employment, output, and income." The most interesting aspect of Steve Forbes'...
Tax Reform - an Exercise in Complexity
Given the opportunity to drive a stake through the heart of the deficit, Congress and the President chose instead to throw a party, On Aug. 5, 1997, Pres. Clinton signed into law a tax package with $94,000,000,000 in tax cuts. The first Federal tax...
The Last Moralist
With the release of his latest picture, "The Funeral," director Abel Ferrara has established himself as something of a rarity within the motion picture industry--a moviemaker with a distinct moral vision. Ferrara has little interest in making movies...
Tiger Is Only Interested in Green
Is ELDRICK "TIGER" WOODS: (A) potentially the greatest golfer the sport has ever known or (B) just a greedy opportunist whose main goal in life is to cash in on his enormous talents and multi-cultural marketability? Perhaps the answer is (C) both...
What Determines How Juries Decide?
A hanging jury is not just more likely to hang, it's more likely to convict, suggests Brian Bornstein, assistant professor of psychology, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge. "Research also shows that jurors who are `death qualified'--that is,...
Winning the Battle for Computer Security
The numbers are staggering. In 1996, American corporations spent almost $6,000,000,000 on computer network security, only to lose an estimated $10,000,000,000 from attacks on their systems. Moreover, the latter figure undoubtedly is low as many of...