USA TODAY

Founded in September of 1982, USA Today is a national daily newspaper published by Gannett Co., Inc. The paper has a Mon.-Thurs. circulation of over 2 million readers. The Friday edition of the paper has a circulation of over 2.5 million readers.The Editor of USA Today is John Hillkirk.

Articles from Vol. 138, No. 2771, August

Avoid These Job Interview Blunders
Most people are on their best behavior when meeting with hiring managers, but some actions fall nothing short of bizarre. In a survey, Office-Team, Menlo Park, Calif., a staffing service specializing in the placement of administrative professionals,...
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Coal Remains a Major Player
Carbon capture and storage, or CCS, is a promising tool that may help the U.S. meet future energy needs while controlling emissions of greenhouse gases linked to climate change, declare researchers at Indiana University, Bloomington. However, CCS presents...
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Come Fly with Me: National Air and Space Museum Tracks Mankind's Mission in the Sky
The Smithsonian Institution's National Air and Space Museum maintains the world's largest collection of historic aircraft and spacecraft among some 50.000 artifacts that range in size from Saturn V rockets to jetliners to gliders to space helmets to...
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Cost Overruns for Reactors in the Offing
The likely cost of electricity for a new generation of nuclear reactors would be 12 to 20 cents per kilowatt hour, considerably more expensive than the average cost of increased use of energy efficiency and renewable energies at six cents per kWh,...
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Does Economic Recovery Hinge on Them?
As a statistical demographic, they control over half of all discretionary spending while holding more than 70% of the country's weatlh and a behavioral trend indicating they still are spending that money, even during the recession--which is why they...
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Don't Let That Bedbugs Bite
Bedbug outbreaks across the U.S. require a proactive approach, advocates Marc Lame, clinical assistant professor at the Indiana University School of Public and Environmental Affairs, Bloomington, and a specialist in pest management. Lame says operators...
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FDA Calls Cheerios an "Unapproved Drug"
The Food and Drug Administration has issued a warning letter to cereal manufacturer General Mills for claiming on its cereal box that Cheerios can help lower cholesterol, and for saying on its website that "diets rich in whole grain foods can reduce...
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Federal Gold Rush Is Bankrupting Country
We are in the midst of the largest Federal gold rush since the 1960s, as government spending is growing by leaps and bounds. The budget hit $3,900,000,000 this year, double the level of spending just eight years ago. The government also is increasing...
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Fleshing out the Mystery of Fossils: Ancients Animals Come to Life in Startling Natural History Exhibition
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] "FOSSIL MYSTERIES" is the largest and most comprehensive exhibit ever undertaken at the San Diego Natural History Museum. Blending traditional and contemporary exhibition techniques, it showcases the last 75,000,000 years...
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Galileo Did Not Get Sent to Jail
"The idea that Galileo [Galilei] was tortured by the Catholic Church for his views on astronomy encapsulates for many people the history of science and religion," muses Ronald Numbers, a professor at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, and editor...
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Galileo Gazes toward the Heavens: Understanding the Contributions of the Father of Astronomy
Galileo, the Medici and the Age of Astronomy" explores lithe extraordinary effect that Galileo's work, as well as that of other luminaries during the age of the Medicis, had on science and the world--and features one of only two remaining telescopes...
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Long-Term Loss of Investors Seen
"Today's Wall Street Journal, New York Times, CNBC, and Bloomberg Financial are filled with stories about highly paid executives who have driven their companies into bankruptcy, while Boards of Directors did little or nothing to stop them from obliterating...
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Newly Found Treasure Trove of Ben Franklin's Letters
A trove of Benjamin Franklin letters has turned up in the British Library. Discovered by Alan Houston, professor of political science at the University of California, Davis, they are copies of correspondence that have not been seen in more than 250...
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Pandemic Detection Needs Improvement
A new system that would warn of an impending pandemic, before the first case of disease emerges in a given population, by detecting subtle signals in human behavior is being proposed by researchers at Purdue University, West Lafayette, Ind. 'The goal...
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Protecting against Spread of Swine Flu
The main route of transmission of the influenza A (H1N1) virus seems to be similar to seasonal influenza, via droplets that are expelled by speaking, sneezing, or coughing, cautions the World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland. An individual...
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Public Trust Doctrine Needed for Oceans
Since Congress lifted a moratorium on offshore drilling last year, Federal lawmakers have grappled with the issue of how best to regulate U.S. ocean waters to allow oil, wave, and wind energy development, while sustainably managing critical fisheries...
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Ranking System Actually Works
A study of 25 years of data from a major college football poll challenges three strongly held beliefs of many coaches and fans. Contrary to conventional wisdom, the research found that teams are not punished by pollsters for losing late in the season;...
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Southwest to Suffer Most from Global Warming
"It is becoming clear that the Southwest is in the front line of ongoing climate change in the country, and the projections are for a much more serious set of problems if climate change isn't slowed dramatically," asserts Jonathan Overpeck, co-author...
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Sustainable Practices Now the Norm
More and more consumers are seeking green products, especially those that focus on energy and water efficiency, and there is every indication that trend only will get stronger, according to home building industry product suppliers who spoke at the...
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Toxic Scare Mongering Mutes Hidden Truth
It would seem that present-day Americans are living in constant danger of toxic overload. We routinely hear stories about how our exposure to mercury, PCBs, pesticides, plastics, and other common toxins is behind everything from autism to cancer. Movies...
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Unproven Strategies Become More Prevalent
In these difficult times, top marketing officers are turning to novel and often unproven strategies that focus on the Internet, partnerships, and new markets, products, and services to help their companies, according to a poll conducted by the American...
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Vast Human Migrations Seem Inevitable
By mid century, people may be fleeing rising seas, droughts, floods, and other effects of changing climate, in migrations that vastly could exceed the scope of anything before, maintains a report by researchers at Columbia University's Center for International...
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Worldwide Recession Marches On
The worldwide recession will continue for the remainder of 2009, with substantial cuts planned in employment and capital spending, according to chief financial officers in the U.S., Asia, and Europe. Many companies face severe credit constraints. Yet,...
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