The Journal of Negro History

Provides information on African American life and history, including the unique facets of African American history, including the first major scholarly analysis of the hip hop movement.

Articles from Vol. 85, No. 4, Fall

African-Americans and Minority Language Maintenance in the United States
INTRODUCTION Over the past thirty years, scholars who study the relationship between language and society (sociolinguists) have devoted a number of studies to the verbal behavior of African-Americans, primarily focusing on the modern and historical...
A Study in Red and Black: Ethnic Humor in Colonial America
Ann Maydosz [*] The "New Found Land," [1] as America was called by Thomas Harriot, one of the continent's first ethnographers, opened a Pandora's box of troubles for the Englishmen who landed there. Confounded by their unpreparedness for life there,...
In Memoriam
STEPHEN HENDERSON 1925-1997 Perhaps I was too young to understand Steve Henderson when I first met him as my chair upon my arrival at Morehouse College. Not an intimidating person--in fact, a very engaging man--he still inspired a wonderment...
NAACP Sponsored Sit-Ins by Howard University Students in Washington, D.C., 1943-1944
Flora Bryant Brown [*] When we think of student led sit-ins we tend to think first of the four young African-American male students at North Carolina A & T State University, who, on February 1, 1960, sat-in at a downtown Woolworth's store in...
Opportunity, Experience, and Recognition: Black Participation in Philadelphia's New Deal Arts Projects, 1936-1942
Arthur R. Jarvis [*] From 1929 until 1941, the entire spectrum of American labor felt the escalating problems of unemployment, hunger, frustration, and hopelessness caused by the Great Depression. Among professional workers severely affected by...
The Contemporaneous Reception of Phillis Wheatley: Newspaper and Magazine Notices during the Years of Fame, 1765-1774
Mukhtar Ali Isani [*] The fame of Phullis Wheatley is often measured in terms of references in the writings of such eminent figures as George Washington, Thomas Jefferson and Benjamin Franklin, but these are only a part of the evidence. Recognition...
The White Rose Mammy: Racial Culture and Politics in World War II Memphis
G. Wayne Dowdy [*] We respectfully solicit the influence of your good offices in having this advertisement removed, for the sake of interracial goodwill, which is unquestionably needed at this time. The above quotation comes from a letter [1]...