The Journal of Negro History

Provides information on African American life and history, including the unique facets of African American history, including the first major scholarly analysis of the hip hop movement.

Articles from Vol. 79, No. 4, Fall

Henry McNeal Turner versus the Tuskegee Machine: Black Leadership in the Nineteenth Century
African American nation building between 1865 and 1899 was intended to be a part of a new nation coming together out of the national fragmentation that characterized the antebellum period. Reconstruction and its aftermath destroyed that goal. African...
In the Service of the United States: Comparative Mortality among African-American and White Troops in the Union Army
The glory of the Civil War lies firmly in the valor of the soldiers on both sides who fought and died for liberty as they saw it. Partially in response to their record, the literature on the War is extraordinarily voluminous. One group whose story has...
Slave Crime in Savannah, Georgia
Black Savannahians before the Civil War deviated every day from the white concept of the ideal slave, but they did not openly rebel. On the one hand, that should not surprise us. As Richard Wade has pointed out, revolt was less likely in the city than...
The "Chords of Love": Legalizing Black Marital and Family Rights in Postwar Texas
In late 1862, concerned about her husband Norflet, Fannie, a slave woman, wrote to him from "Spring Hill" plantation in Harrison County, Texas. A personal servant to Theophilus Perry, Norflet accompanied his master when the latter joined the Confederate...