The Journal of Negro History

Provides information on African American life and history, including the unique facets of African American history, including the first major scholarly analysis of the hip hop movement.

Articles from Vol. 81, No. 1-4, Annual

"And the Truth Shall Make You Free": Richard Robert Wright, Sr., Black Intellectual and Iconoclast, 1877-1897
The last quarter of the nineteenth century following the end of Reconstruction, which historian Rayford W. Logan termed "The Nadir," black southerners witnessed a steady deterioration in their status that culminated with farm tenancy, sharecropping,...
James Emman Kwegyir Aggrey: An African Intellectual in the United States
"When men are intellectually greater than others, we learn from their utterances; when they are morally better than others, we learn from their lives." - J.E.K. Aggrey After Booker T. Washington's death in 1915, James Emman Kwegyir Aggrey, sometimes...
Lucy Diggs Slowe: Champion of the Self-Determination of African-American Women in Higher Education
While we are aware of the prominent African-American women educators of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries who were teachers, principals, and school founders, such as Fanny Jackson Coppin, Anna Julia Cooper, Lucy Laney, Charlotte Hawkins Brown, and...
Mary McLeod Bethune's "Last Will and Testament": A Legacy for Race Vindication
After the impressive 1926 Convention of the National Association of Colored Women (NACW) in Oakland, California, an enthusiast referring to the delegates wrote, "Their luggage, consisting of expensive and durable suitcases, bags, overnight bags of all...
Nannie Helen Burroughs: 'The Black Goddess of liberty.'(Vindicating the Race: Contributions to African-American Intellectual History)
As an educator, institution and organization-builder, and major figure in the black church and secular feminist movements, Nannie Helen Burroughs was one of the best known and well-respected African-Americans of the early twentieth century. Yet, except...
Out of the Shadow of Tuskegee: Margaret Murray Washington, Social Activism, and Race Vindication
When Margaret James Murray Washington died on June 4, 1925, condolences flooded Tuskegee Institute from across the nation, including the President of the United States, Calvin Coolidge. In statements from friends, colleagues, former students, and admirers,...
Racial Consciousness and Black Scholarship: Charles H. Wesley and the Consciousness of 'Negro Labor in the United States.'(Vindicating the Race: Contributions to African-American Intellectual History)
Charles Harris Wesley's pathbreaking study, Negro Labor in the United States, 1850-1925: A Study in American Economic History charted a new direction in African-American social science and historical research. The sophistication of Negro Labor's methodology...
Telling the Truth: Alice Childress as Theorist and Playwright
In Their Place on the Stage: Black Women Playwrights in America (1988), Elizabeth Brown-Guillory declared that "Alice Childress is the only black woman in America whose plays have been written, produced, and published over a period of four decades."(1)...
Vindicating Martin Luther King, Jr.: The Road to a Color-Blind Society
As V. P. Franklin has reminded us, African-American intellectuals have consistently tried to vindicate the race from conceptions in the larger society that we are inferior.(1) Martin Luther King, Jr. by example was a "race vindicator," and he saw the...