The Journal of Negro History

Provides information on African American life and history, including the unique facets of African American history, including the first major scholarly analysis of the hip hop movement.

Articles from Vol. 82, No. 1, Winter

African-American Soldiers and Filipinos: Racial Imperialism, Jim Crow and Social Relations
In February 1899, the Spanish Government ratified a peace treaty which "entrusted" the Philippines to the United States. Despite the success in the war with Spain, the United States military forces could not avoid conflict with another opponent in the...
After Emancipation: Aspects of Village Life in Guyana, 1869-1911
After emancipation the actions of many British Caribbean sugar plantation workers created conditions that led to new relations with former masters, separate communities away from the plantations for themselves, and renewed migration from Africa. In the...
Black Birds in the Sky: The Legacies of Bessie Coleman and Dr. Mae Jemison
I knew we had no aviators, neither men nor women, and I knew the Race needed to be represented along this most important line, so I thought it my duty to risk my life to learn aviation and to encourage flying among men and women of our Race who are so...
"Can These Bones Live?": The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People in Alabama, 1918-1930
A state located in the "Heart of Dixie" is an unlikely leader in the establishment of NAACP branches. Nevertheless, a chapter of the militant civil rights organization was formed in the state in 1913 - which was just four years after the formation of...
In Memoriam and Tribute
Dr. LORRAINE A. WILLIAMS 1923-1996 Dr. Lorraine A. Williams, fifth editor of the Journal of Negro History, passed to Glory on May 21, 1996 in Washington, D.C. In memory of, and in tribute to, Dr. Williams, we are publishing, with the permission of her...
Investing in the Past: Letters of Charles Henry Stocker, African-American Businessman of New Orleans, 1868-1874
During the decade before the Civil War, Louisiana's free people of color were by far the most prosperous group of African-Americans in the United States. While these elite blacks were denied the basic civil rights and social privileges of white society,...
Jehiel C. Beman: A Leader of the Northern Free Black Community
Americans of all races have been denied access to many pieces of history which are crucial to understanding their past and therefore necessary for determining how to proceed into the future. Jehiel C. Beman was a member of the Northern, urban, free black...
Loyal to the End: The Life of James Page 1808-1883
"Slaves obey your human masters with fear and trembling; and do it with a sincere heart, as though you were serving Christ..." Ephesians 6:5(1) "Ever your kind Old Servant and friend till death - James" Rev. James Page (1868)(2) Religious indoctrination,...
Making Jesus Black: The Historiographical Debate on the Roots of African-American Christianity
The convergence of cultures which began with the importation of West African slaves into the British North American colonies has resulted in some of the more poignant ironies in American history. Perhaps chief among these was the widespread adoption...
Out of Africa: The Dilemmas of Afrocentricity
Imposed in bold print over the cover of the September 22, 1991 issue of Newsweek was the question: "Was Cleopatra Black?" In the background was a picture of an elaborate Egyptian Glyph bedecked in 1990s style Afrocentric garb. The issue at hand was far...
Playing Ball in a Black and White "Field of Dreams": Afro-Caribbean Ballplayers in the Negro Leagues, 1910-1950
An established part of Americana, for many Americans, baseball evokes nostalgic remembrances of green pastoral spaces, individual triumph, and the "good ole days when we played just for the fun of it." As a trope within popular culture in the United...
"Shouting Curses": The Politics of "Bad" Language in Richard Wright's 'Black Boy.'
In "Everybody's Protest Novel," James Baldwin envisions Richard Wright and Harriet Beecher Stowe in mortal combat: "it seems that the contemporary Negro novelist and the dead New England woman are locked together in a deadly, timeless battle; the one...