The Journal of Negro History

Provides information on African American life and history, including the unique facets of African American history, including the first major scholarly analysis of the hip hop movement.

Articles from Vol. 85, No. 1-2, Spring

A Fiftieth Anniversary Celebration FROM TO Slavery Freedom
September 22, 1997, marks the fiftieth anniversary of the publication of From Slavery to Freedom: A History of African Americans, by John Hope Franklin. Now in its seventh edition and co-authored by Alfred Moss, this book has reshaped the way African-American...
Contextualizing from Slavery to Freedom in the Study of Post Emancipation Black Women's History
Rosalyn Terborg-Penn [*] Dr. Franklin, Dr. Moss and guests, I want to open by thanking the committee for inviting me to participate in this historic event. I am deeply honored. My assignment was to look at the impact of From Slavery to Freedom...
Defining and Studying the Modern African Diaspora
Colin A. Palmer [*] The 1999 annual meeting of the American Historical Association will have as its theme "Diasporas and Migrations in History." This has been welcomed by those scholars whose scholarly interest and research focus on what has come...
From Slavery to Freedom and the Conceptualization of African-American History
Thomas Holt [*] "Every generation has the opportunity to write its own history, and indeed is obliged to do so. Only in that way can it provide its contemporaries with the materials vital to understanding the present and to planning strategies for...
From Slavery to Freedom: The Journey from Our Known Past to Our Unknown Future
V.P. Franklin [*] Nineteen forty-seven was considered the best of times and the worst of times for African Americans. It was the year that Jackie Robinson became the first black player in major league baseball. In 1947, according to a report by...
John Hope Franklin: And the Year of Jubilee
Debra Newman Ham [*] Leviticus 25:8-10 reads: And thou shalt number seven sabbaths of years unto thee, seven times seven years; and the space of the seven sabbaths of years shall be unto thee forty and nine years. Then shalt thou cause the trumpet...
John Hope Franklin: Scholarship with Honesty and Purpose
A Presentation by Professor Percy R. Luney, Jr. North Carolina Central University School of Law September 19, 1997 When one reads From Slavery to Freedom: A History of Negro Americans, by John Hope Franklin, the immediate impression, and for me,...
Paradigms, Politic, and Patriarchy in the Making of a Black History: Reflections on from Slavery to Freedom
Darlene Clark Hine [*] "Every generation has the opportunity to write its own history, and indeed it is obliged to do so. Only in that way can it provide its contemporaries with the materials vital to understanding the present and to planning strategies...
Remarks by John W. Franklin on the Occasion of the 50th Anniversary of the Publication of from Slavery to Freedom Durham Hilton (North Carolina) September 20, 1997
Good Evening. I am five years younger than the book! Therefore, I cannot imagine a time before From Slavery to Freedom. Over the years I have had the opportunity to watch as the world has responded to the book and its author. My mother and I have...
Slavery and Southern Violence: County Court Petitions and the South's Peculiar Institution
Loren Schweninger [*] Twenty-eight years ago this month, I began a seminar at the University of Chicago on Alabama Reconstruction with Professor Franklin. As a number of his students who are here now know, Professor Franklin's seminars were life...
The Finished Business of John Hope Franklin the Unfinished Business of White America and Black America
Chuck Stone Walter Spearman Professor School of Journalism and Mass Communication University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Keynote address for the 50th Anniversary Two-Day Celebration of John Hope Franklin's Book, From Slavery to Freedom September...
The from Slavery to Freedom Fiftieth Anniversary Symposium September 19-20, 1997
John Dittmer [*] I am pleased and honored to participate in this celebration of a great historian and his work. In preparing these remarks, knowing that I would be the final speaker today, I feared that so much would have already been said about...