The George Washington International Law Review

The George Washington International Law Review is a magazine focusing on Law

Articles from Vol. 33, No. 2, 2001

Inconsistency and Impunity in International Human Rights Law: Can the International Criminal Court Solve the Problems Raised by the Rwanda and Augusto Pinochet Cases
Representatives from 120 countries gathered in Rome in 1998 and drafted the statute for a future International Criminal Court (ICC) to judge "those accused of genocide and other comparable crimes."1 In order for the court to become a reality, sixty nations...
International Mavericks: A Comparative Analysis of Selected Human Rights and Foreign Policy Issues in Iran and the United States
INTRODUCTION The question "Why do nations obey international law?"1 suggests a follow-up query: "Why do nations refuse to obey international law?" Starting down that path, a student of American law interested in international human rights might well...
The Limits of Informal Regulatory Cooperation in International Affairs: A Review of the Global Intellectual Property Regime
I. INTRODUCTION: THEORY AND PROCESS Globalization jeopardizes the effectiveness of domestic regulatory institutions. In order to adapt to the internationalization of traditionally domestic regulatory regimes, regulators from different countries must...
The OECD Anti-Bribery Convention: Coverage of Foreign Subsidiaries
I. INTRODUCTION In December 1997 U.S. Secretary of State Madeleine Albright and ministers representing the other members of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD)' and five non-members participating in the Working Group on Bribery...
The World after Dolly: International Regulation of Human Cloning
I. INTRODUCTION On February 22, 1997 the line between reality and science fiction blurred when the world discovered that a clone-a genetic twin of an organism-had been created from the single cell of an adult sheep.1 The clone, Dolly, made society realize...
United States of America, Home of the Cheap and the Gray: A Comparison of Recent Court Decisions Affecting the U.S. and European Gray Markets
I. INTRODUCTION Although most people are familiar with the term `black market goods,' few can readily define the `gray market.' So-called `gray goods' are neither legal nor illegal. They have not been smuggled or stolen; rather, they have been placed...