Literature/Film Quarterly

Contains literature film adaptations, book reviews, and interviews with directors, screenwriters, and critics.

Articles from Vol. 5, No. 4, Fall

Appreciating Shakespeare on Film
Appreciating Shakespeare on Film Jack J. Jorgens, Shakespeare on Film. Bloomington: Indiana Univ. Press, 1977. 337 pages, $15.Jack J. Jorgens' Shakespeare on Film does more than its title suggests. Certainly it deals with cinematic treatments of Shakespeare's...
As You like It and It Happened One Night: The Generic Pattern of Comedy
I would like to propose an aesthetic context in which the fiction film can be understood as "literary," and to do so without immediately offending purists of any ideological persuasion. We know that some scholars are either outraged or amused by the...
Criticism for the Filmed Shakespeare
We have grown accustomed, perhaps too accustomed, to fairly well-defined approaches in literary criticism-formalism, Marxist critiques, psychological analysis, the historical method. That these separate approaches get us closer to the "truth" of a literary...
Guest Editor's Introduction
During the past decade Shakespeare films have come to be seen as a valuable means of bringing performance into the classroom and as a way to examine aspects of the plays which otherwise emerge only in the theatre. Courses using Shakespeare films are...
Henry V: Onstage and on Film
Pageantry, spectacle, and visual display have dominated nearly every stage production of Henry V. Though there have been occasional attempts to keep the play to a more standard theatrical simplicity-symbolism, or Elizabethan "purity"-for the most part...
Kozintsev's King Lear: Filming a Tragic Poem
Kozintsev's King Lear: Filming a Tragic PoemKing Lear (Kami Lir). A Lenfilm Production, 1970. Scripted and directed by Grigori Kozintsev, based upon Boris Pasternak's Russian translation of the play. Camera: Jonas Gricius. Design: Eugene Enei. Costumes:...
Olivier's Hamlet: A Film-Infused Play
Since Sir Laurence Olivier brought Shakespeare films into the modern era with Henry V in 1944 and Hamlet in 1948, over thirty films have been based on plays by Shakespeare. Although five well-known versions of Hamlet have been made, Olivier's remains...
Peter Brook's Interpretation of King Lear: "Nothing Will Come of Nothing"
Peter Brook's powerful film interpretation of Shakespeare's King Lear is a unique achievement. But its power and uniqueness are displayed at the expense of Shakespeare. Perhaps we should be thankful for the memorable moments that Brook provides; how...
Shakespeare on Film: Towards an Audience Perceived and Perceiving
How one deals with Shakespeare on film is in itself both a critical and a pedagogical problem. Teaching experience demands that we find ways to explore the Shakespearean film as a realization of the play. This requires a careful consideration of two...
Shakespeare Redivivus: Supplementary Techniques for Teaching Shakespeare
To begin with-an admission. I confess to not being convinced that films are the best way to teach Shakespeare. Indeed, improperly used, they may even be dangerous. For example, I once showed an undergraduate class the brilliant RSC film version of Midsummer...
The Kozintsev Lear Diary
The Kozintsev Lear Diary Grigori Kozintsev, King Lear: The Space of Tragedy. Trans. Mary Mackintosh. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1977. 272 pp. $14.95.Since I believe Grigori Kozintsev's King Lear to be the most remarkable cinematic transformation...
The Synergistic Use of Shakespearean Film and Videotape
The B.B.C. 's current project to make the complete plays of Shakespeare available on videotape, suitable for most types of television presentation, as well as cinematic adaptation, lends a new interest to the discussion of the best applications of such...
Throne of Blood: A Morality Dance
In the dialogue concerning the adaptation of Shakespeare to the screen, Kurosawa's Throne of Blood (1957) is a pivotal film for it polarizes the critics-usually according to which medium they feel the greatest allegiance. Literary critics frequently...
Time in Play and Film: Macbeth and Throne of Blood
The text of Shakespeare's Macbeth1 as it has come down to us is approximately 2100 lines, five acts, long. When played on stage, Macbeth can take from one and a half to three hours to perform, depending on cuts, spectacle, mute action, scene changes...
Zeffirelli's Romeo and Juliet: The Camera versus the Text
Students of Shakespeare on film are by now well aware of the film director's basic task, as the late Grigori Kozintsev has described it: to translate (or transform) the verbal medium of poetry into the visual medium of film. But true as that statement...
Zeffirelli's Romeo and Juliet: Words into Picture and Music
Franco Zeffirelli's adaptation of William Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet never apologizes for being a movie and not a play.1 From its opening panoramic shot of fair Verona to its closing procession of chastened Capulets and Montagues filing past the...