Literature/Film Quarterly

Contains literature film adaptations, book reviews, and interviews with directors, screenwriters, and critics.

Articles from Vol. 28, No. 1, 2000

Appropriation of Generic Convention: Film as Paradigm in Michael Herr's Dispatches
Since publication in 1977, Michael Heds Dispatches has developed a reputation as one of the definitive works on the American experience in Vietnam. A collection of articles originally published in Esquire, Rolling Stone and New American Review between...
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Authenticity and Ethics in the Third Man
The Third Man, set in Vienna in 1948, has been termed a portrayal of the Cold War. I challenge this assertion, made by Robert H. Miller ( 104-06) and by Lynette Carpenter ( 140). However, novel and film served as major source materials in an exhibition...
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Dinesen in Three Dimensions: A Comparing of Irony in Two Films of Dinesen's Stories
The best setting for the tales of Isak Dinesen (Karen Blixen 1885-1962) is undoubt edly their original setting-in the parlor of her house in Africa, before the fire, as friends and lovers gathered to hear her tell a story. The best medium, her rich,...
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Frank Lloyd's Berkeley Square (1933): Re-Adapting Henry James's the Sense of the Past
Director Frank Lloyd's romantic fantasy film Berkeley Square (Fox, 1933) holds a strange but nearly forgotten place in cinema and literary history: It is the first film based on a work by Henry James. For several reasons, this position is something of...
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Gender, Caretaking, and the Three Sabrinas
All three versions of Sabrina have the trappings of a Cinderella story. In the stageplay (Samuel Taylor, Sabrina Fair; or, A Woman of the World 1953-54) and the two films made from it (Sabrina, dir. Billy Wilder and starring Humphrey Bogart, Audrey Hepburn,...
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Hoffa and the Untouchables: Mamet's Brutal Orders of Authority
Two of David Mamet's most intriguing screenplays, Hoffa and The Untouchables, consider the dynamics of masculine power from both inside and outside of written law. In both cases, a more basic, primitive national law emerges-one of violent aggression,...
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Letters & "Debates"
Two After-Images: On Rereading the Essays on Jewish Propaganda and Gentile America Literature/Film Quarterly is to be congratulated both for being liberal enough to publish a controversial and suspect essay, and for being politically astute enough to...
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Portrayals of Black Masculinity in Oscar Micheaux's the Homesteader
Oscar Micheaux is the preeminent figure in African-American silent cinema. He was the most prolific filmmaker of the silent era, directing at least twenty-eight silent features or re-edited versions of films between 1919-1929. He remained in the industrry...
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Raising Cain with the Censors, Again: The Postman Always Rings Twice (1946)
James M. Cain's The Postman Always Rings Twice, like Double Indemnity, was just one example of a 1930s novel that the Production Code Administration (PCA) would not touch but later endorsed during World War II when conditions were more appropriate. These...
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Re-Viewing Stanley Kubrick
Frederic Raphael. Eyes Wide Open: A Memoir of Stanley Kubrick. New York: Ballantine Books, 1999. 190pp. $12 (paper) Alexander Walker. Stanley Kurbrick, Director. Revised edition. New York: Norton, 1999. Filmography. 376pp. $35 (hardcover) Screenwriter...
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Some Notes on Racial Trauma in Peter Weir's Fearless
If Italo Calvino's assertion is correct, that cities (or nations) are built from fears, what landscape might an absence of fear reveal? What borders might disappear, what walls come crashing down, what new identities be constituted? My reading of racial...
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Sweetest Tongue Has Sharpest Tooth: The Dangers of Dreaming in Neil Jordan's the Company of Wolves
Sweetest Tongue Has Sharpest Tooth': The Dangers of Dreaming in Neil Jordan's In light of Irish filmmaker Neil Jordan's inspired and acclaimed 1997 adaptation of Patrick McCabe's The Butcher Boy (with a script co-written by McCabe and Jordan), a look...
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The Manchurian Candidate and the Gender of the Cold War
The Manchurian Candidate ( 1962) is one of the greatest of US Cold War films but has been discussed surprisingly little. Of the discussions we do have, perhaps the best have been provided by three fine Cold War scholars-Michael Paul Rogin, Stephen Whitfield,...
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When "Good" Men Turn Bad: Mary Reilly as Disturbing Allegory of Domestic Abuse
In "Transformations of Terror," Brian Rose identifies Robert Louis Stevenson's Jekyll and Hyde as one of our culture's most revealing "tracer texts" (37). Such texts are continually reutilized over an extended period of time as matrices for the expression...
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