Literature/Film Quarterly

Contains literature film adaptations, book reviews, and interviews with directors, screenwriters, and critics.

Articles from Vol. 26, No. 1, 1998

Alive and Well: Western Myth in Western Movies
With the critical and commercial successes of, first, Dances with Wolves and City Slickers (both 1991) and then Unforgiven ( 1992), Western movies, which had been suffering through an extended period of unpopularity, began to enjoy something of a renascence....
East Is East, and West Is West? Otherness in Capra's the Bitter Tea of General Yen
Many critics argue that Capra's "real" career started with Lady for a Day (1933) and yet, preceded by it were The Bitter Tea of General Yen ( 1932) and almost two dozen other films. The fact that Capra has come to be known as the somewhat idealistic...
Godard's "Cruel Muse"
Dixon, Wheeler Winston. The Films of Jean-Luc Godard. Albany: SUNY Press, 1997. 290 p. $56.50 hardcover $18.95 paperback. The cinema is a cruel muse. Many of its leading artists have been washed up, finished, abandoned by the film companies and the public,...
Imagism and Martin Scorsese: Images Suspended and Extended
In his practice of continually "freezing" an array of images on his 1993 film The Age of Innocence, Martin Scorsese is reaffirming Wallace Stevens's assertion in his poem "Crude Foyer" that the "landscape of the mind/Is a landscape only of the eye" (305)....
Nationhood and Decolonization in the English Patient
Introduction Ondaatje's The English Patient has had a brief but spectacular history. The novel won the Booker Prize after its publication and received very positive reviews; the film dominated the 1997 Academy Awards. Yet the relationship between the...
Shadowlands and the Redemption of Light
Shadowlands1 sets up the problem of a comfortable academic who talks about love and pain, but seems to have neither. He is also a fantasy writer who insists on "magic" as a significant force against the rational analysis of his colleagues. He needs emotional...
Shepherding the Weak: The Ethics of Redemption in Quentin Tarantino's Pulp Fiction
Although a number of critics in the popular pressl laud Quentin Tarantino's Pulp Fiction (1994) for its non-linear narrative, quirky performances, and oddly resonant dialogue regarding such issues as hamburgers, television pilot episodes, and foot massages,...
Sin and Cinema
Frank Walsh. Sin and Censorship: The Catholic Church and the Motion Picture Industry. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1996. Gregory Black. Hollywood Censored: Morality Codes, Catholics and the Movies. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1994 Gregory...
The Sacred and the Profane: Examining the Religious Subtext of Ridley Scott's Blade Runner
Ridley Scott's 1982 film Blade Runner has often eluded precise critical definition. Although based loosely on Philip K. Dick's 1969 novel Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?, Blade Runner is not solely a science fiction film; instead it appropriates...
Volatile Forms: The Transgressive Energy of Ragtime as Novel and Film
"Father kept himself under control by writing in his journal. This was a system too, the system of language and conceptualization. It proposed that human beings, by the act of making witness, warranted times and places for their existence other than...
Whose Future? Star Wars, Alien, and Blade Runner
The science fiction film, as a construction somewhat removed from everyday reality, is a privileged vehicle for the presentation of ideology. Because it is less concerned than other genres with the surface structure of social reality, science fiction...
Writing the West: Iconic and Literal Truth in Unforgiven
The popular and critical success of Clint Eastwood's Unforgiven (1992) has prompted a number of discussions about the status of the Western, Eastwood's cinematic persona, and the currency of each in a changing cultural landscape. An accepted critical...