Literature/Film Quarterly

Contains literature film adaptations, book reviews, and interviews with directors, screenwriters, and critics.

Articles from Vol. 32, No. 3, 2004

A Bout De Souffle: The Film of the Book
Not the cinematic adaptation of a literary pretext: A bout de souffle (1960) by Jean-Luc Godard is based on an original treatment. Nor the book of the film: A bout de souffle (1960) by Claude Francolin is the literary adaptation of a cinematic pretext,...
ABSENT PRESENCES IN LIMINAL PLACES: Murnau's Nosferatu and the Otherworld of Stoker's Dracula
"Life is nothings"1- Bram StokerAthough the credits of F. W. Murnau's Nosferatu2 acknowledge Bram Stoker's Dracula as the fictional source of Henrik Galeen's screenplay,3 most critics tend to dismiss any thematic connection between novel and film. To...
Blade Runner and the Postmodern: A Reconsideration
The ambivalence implicit in the two versions of Ridley Scott's Blade Runner (1982; "Director's Cut," 1992) echoes the diverse and divided critical responses to the film(s). Indeed, this film about authenticity and simulation has been so thoroughly interpreted...
Chaucerian Fabliaux, Cinematic Fabliau: Pier Paolo Pasolini's I Racconti Di Canterbury
Despite claiming first prize at the 1972 Berlin Film Festival, Pier Paolo Pasolini's I racconti di Canterbury has never garnered widespread scholarly acclaim. Many Pasolini scholars have condemned the film or apologized for its failings, especially in...
Contrasting Visions of a Saint: Carl Dreyer's the Passion of Joan of Arc and Luc Besson's the Messenger
Emerson, writing in Nature, describes his perceptive experience as though he were a "transparent eyeball; I am nothing; I see all; the currents of the Universal Being circulate through me; I am part or parcel of God" (10). Emerson's immersion into complete...
Faces and Masks: Peter Shaffer's Amadeus from Stage to Screen
"Mozart! Forgive your assassin!" screams Antonio Salicri, esteemed composer to the court of Joseph II of Austria. "I confess; I killed you!"Milos Forman's Amadeus opens with a scream of anguish, accompanied by the two big opening chords of the Overture...
Hanging with Hitchcock
Hanging with Hitchcock Christopher D. Morris. The Hanging Figure: On Suspense and the Films of Alfred Hitchcock. Westport: Praeger, 2002. 314 pp. $65.50 cloth.Alfred Hitchcock is widely regarded as a great artist, infinitely more profound than a master...
Making Meaning: Publicizing Iain Softley's the Wings of the Dove (1997)
To date the majority of academic readings of Iain Softley's film Wings of the Dove (1997) have focused either on issues of textual fidelity or directorial technique. Dale M. Bauer praises it for its successful rendering of "Jamesian content, along with...
Reframing the Chinese Cultural Revolution in Diaspora: Joan Chen's the Sent-Down Girl
After the remarkable success of her directorial debut Xiu Xiu: The Sent Down Girl (Whispering Steppes, 1998), Joan Chen was once asked why she chose to make a film set in the 1966-1976 Chinese Cultural Revolution. Chen answered, "It was a story about...
The Cold War's "Undigested Apple-Dumpling": Imaging Moby-Dick in 1956 and 2001
On 10 September 2001, I was writing the following as a chapter in my book project about canonical novels adapted into Cold War American films: In Approaches to Teaching Moby-Dick, one of a series of pedagogically-oriented Modern Language Association...
The Passion of Mel Gibson
There's something almost hoary about Gibson's The Passion of the Christ (2004). Not that John Debney's score isn't hip (voices, flutes, thrumming electronic drums) and Gibson's Jesus stoic and cool and capable of sustaining pain beyond normal human limits....
Woody Allen's Annie Hall: Galatea's Triumph over Pygmalion
"I hate men for the ways they treat women . . ."-Jane TompkinsAs we all know, representation is seldom (if ever) a neutral activity, and while we all participate in such, those who forge a culture's reigning images have a power that escapes others. This...