Literature/Film Quarterly

Contains literature film adaptations, book reviews, and interviews with directors, screenwriters, and critics.

Articles from Vol. 24, No. 1, 1996

All That Jazz : Bob Fosse's Solipsistic Masterpiece
In his magnificent creation All That Jazz, Bob Fosse implies that all our lives are magnificent creations, for there is no reality outside of the imagination that conceives it and the mind that perceives it. Life is an individual experience as each imagination...
A Sensible Screenplay
A Sensible Screenplay Emma Thompson. The Sense and Sensibility Screenplay and Diaries: Bringing Jane Austen 's Novel to Film. New York: Newmarket Press, 1995. 288pp. Illustrated. $23.95For the first time ever in 1966 the Academy of Motion Picture Arts...
Bathgate in the Time of Coppola: A Reverie
Could E. L. Doctorow's Billy Bathgate (1987) be what it is had Francis Coppola's Cotton Club (1984) not preceded it?Credits for the screenplay include Coppola, along with William Kennedy and Mario Puzo. A triumvirate of talent triumphantly mines material...
Civil Rights and the Black Presence in Baby Doll
Tennessee Williams's screenplay Baby Doll was aie film célèbre of 1956. Released by Warner Brothers, it was one of the most provocative collaborative ventures between Williams and director Elia Kazan.1 Baby Doll caused a scandal because of its shocking...
Despair Not, Neither to Presume: The French Lieutenant's Woman: A Screenplay
Both Magritte's and Pirandello's works involve as their primary subject other works of art. In both, the border between the interior work and the larger reality that surrounds it is obscure, creating a confusion of reality levels. And both raise questions...
Driving Doctor Ford
The motion picture House of Games is a "battle of the sexes" played out by its protagonists. Judith Fetterley has argued that much of what passes for romance in American literature is a power struggle between the main male and female characters disguised...
From der Reigen to la Ronde Transposition of a Stageplay to the Cinema
Arthur Schnitzler, a Viennese contemporary of writer and physician Sigmund Freud (Nehring 179-94) wrote many plays and short stories. He is considered to be perhaps the best chronicler of fin-de-siècle Vienna and the dying Austro-Hungarian empire (Alter...
Irony and Cliché: Malamud's the Natural in the 1980s
Bernard Malamud's early fiction, which centered around antiquated lower East Side characters, first appeared in the 1950s, when the children and grandchildren of immigrant Jews were fully assimilating into American life. Malamud's matchmakers, tailors,...
Japanese Cinema Reframed
Japanese Cinema ReframedJapanese Cinema Refrained Reframing Japanese Cinema: Authorship, Genre and History. Arthur Nolletti, Jr. and David Desser, eds., Bloomington: Indiana UP, 1992. xviii+ 365 pages. $39.95 cloth, $18.95 paperback.Reframing Japanese...
Levinson's Roy: A Child's Hero
"There are so many young boys you influence," Iris says to Roy Hobbs in both Bernard Malamud's The Natural and director Barry Levinson's film version. However, the movie alters the gist of the conversation between Iris and Roy from this:"There are so...
Psycho's Allegory of Seeing
Recent studies by Rosalind Krauss and Martin Jay consider surrealist photography and film as part of a more generalized revolt against the philosophical tradition of the Cartesian self; for both writers, surrealism's protest often took the form of an...
Spike Lee and the American Tradition
From the moment it opened, Spike Lee's movie Do the Right Thing has raised questions and aroused controversy among critics and ordinary moviegoers alike. From its initial success at the Cannes Film Festival to its almost complete exclusion from the Academy...
The Accidental Tourist on Page and on Screen: Interrogating Normative Theories about Film Adaptation
The issue of adaptation has long been a salient one among film critics for quite practical reasons, as Dudley Andrew has observed:The making of a film out of an earlier text is virtually as old as the machinery of cinema itself. Well over half of all...
The Construction of Racism through Narrative and Cinematography in the Letter
We see (in The Birth of a Nation) Negroes shoving white men off the sidewalks, Negroes quitting work to dance, Negroes beating a crippled old white patriarch,... Negroes "drunk with wine and power," Negroes mocking their white master in chains, Negroes...
The Hunt for "Big Red": The Bedford Incident, Melville, and the Cold War
When The Bedford Incident, directed by James B. Harris, was released in the fall of 1965, reviewers emphasized its relationship to two earlier films about the hazards of living in a world ruled by the principle of Mutual Assured Destruction: Dr. Strangelove,...
The Return of the Father in Spielberg's the Color Purple
When Steven Spielberg set out to film Alice Walker's The Color Purple, he was faced with a problem that confronts most directors who choose to adapt novels into film: length. Walker's tersely written three hundred-page novel, covering fifty years and...
Transmitting the Bildungsroman to the Small Screen: David Hare's Dreams of Leaving and Heading Home
David Hare and his play writing colleagues, weaned on 1960s British university radicalism, have continued the expression of chronic social discontent begun so scathingly by John Osborne's 1956 play Look Back in Anger. But in an effort to spread their...
Woman-The Image of the "Other" in Israeli Society
Can there be an actively radical, anti-conformist stance on political, national, and social issues in a work of art preserving traditional sexual roles and masculine-feminine stereotypes?My analysis of the film rendering of an Israeli short story (written...