American Journal of Psychotherapy

The American Journal of Psychotherapy is a professional journal covering issues in psychotherapy, including book reviews and software reviews. Founded in 1939, the Association for the Advancement of Psychotherapy publishes the American Journal of Psychotherapy four times a year. Dr. Byram T. Karasu is Editor-in-Chief.

Articles from Vol. 48, No. 1, Winter

Book Reviews -- Cognitive-Behavioral Treatment of Borderline Personality Disorder by Marsha M. Linehan
This book is about methods to alleviate the disruptive distress of borderline personality disorders by targeting behavior change rather than focusing on symptoms, traits or feelings. Although validating the borderline as a person by acknowledging her...
Book Reviews -- Crisis Intervention Strategies by Burl E. Gilliland and Richard K. James
Authors Gilliland and James have an active practice in crisis intervention. They also teach the subject at Memphis State University. Crisis Intervention Strategies is a literature review as well as an eclectic "how to" manual for both practitioners and...
Book Reviews -- Experiential Guidelines: Practical Guidelines Edited by Tony Hobbes
The Freudian Weltanschauung held that humans are objects in the universe--subject to unalterable natural and psychological laws. Modern behavioral science, in sharp contrast, has placed humans at the center of the universe--as much the lawmakers as subjects...
Book Reviews -- Female Identity Conflict in Clinical Practice by Doris Bernstein, Norbert Freedman and Betsy Distler
This book is based on previous publications by the deceased psychoanalyst Doris Bernstein, especially two articles from 1983 and 1990 in the International Journal of Psycho-Analysis. The methodology of the book is simply the observations coming from...
Book Reviews -- from Inner Sources: New Directions in Object Relations Therapy Edited by N. Gregory Hamilton
Anthologies can be vehicles for editors who lack the creativity to write a book; they can be a means of publishing to escape perishing; they can be a collection of writings for which the reader requires the nimblest of imaginations to see why they should...
Book Reviews -- Integrating Individual and Family Therapy by Larry B. Feldman
Feldman addresses the often conflicted interface between individual and family therapy. He states that the rigid separation between the two approaches impairs clinical assessment and treatment; and that using both approaches can promote more effective...
Book Reviews -- Medical Issues and Eating Disorders: The Interface Edited by Allan S. Kaplan and Paul E. Garfinkel
In their introduction to this volume, the editors evoke the need "for a comprehensive clinically oriented medical text on the eating disorders for clinicians." Without question, there is a need for a text that would address psychiatrists' (and nonmedical...
Book Reviews -- Peace, War, and Mental Health: Couples Therapists Look at the Dynamics Edited by Barbara Jo Brothers
While I review this collection of papers on peace, war, and mental health, I am tracking the development of the Israeli-PLO accord and its unsettled possibilities. The two factions reached their agreement with uncertainty about the soundness of the foundation...
Book Reviews -- Professional Burnout Edited by W. B. Schaufeli, C. Maslach and T. Marek
At a time when external constraints make successful psychotherapy an increasingly difficult achievement, it is reasonable to assume that more and more of psychotherapists will experience burnout. If one wished to study the burnout of psychotherapists,...
Book Reviews -- Psychodynamic Technique in the Treatment of the Eating Disorders Edited by C. Philip Wilson, Charles C. Hogan and Ira L. Mintz
Psychodynamic Technique in the Treatment of the Eating Disorders is a sophisticated text for the experienced clinician who is trained in psychoanalytic theory. Although the volume is a collection of independent pieces by 10 contributors, the bulk of...
Book Reviews -- Resolving Impasses in Therapeutic Relationships by Sue Nathanson Elkind
Who among us psychotherapists has not wished for a book showing us how to resolve the impasses we inevitably encounter with some patients? Who among us do not, at least secretly, wonder if some of our therapeutic endeavors and their rupture might have...
Book Reviews -- the Dependent Personality by Robert Bornstein
Dependent Personality Disorder, a diagnostic category that is only a decade old, is attracting extensive research attention. Robert Bornstein's purpose in writing The Dependent Personality is to review the empirical literature on Dependent Personality...
Book Reviews -- the Mismeasure of Women by Carol Tavris
The subtitle of this elegant book, Why women are not the better sex, the inferior sex, or the opposite sex, instantly conveys its major themes and main message. While Carol Tavris would like to eschew all "oversimplified" dichotomies, including the maximalist/minimalist...
Book Reviews -- the Self in Emotional Distress: Cognitive and Psychodynamic Perspectives Edited by Zindel V. Segal and Sidney J. Blatt
The editors are to be commended for this research--an interchange between two quite different theoretical approaches responding to the same questions with the hope of clarifying concepts that have not been similarly interpreted. It is an early step toward...
Book Reviews -- Treatment of Adult Survivors of Incest (Clinical Practice Series) Edited by Patricia L. Paddison
When I first saw this small book I thought it was incredibly presumptuous to attempt a meaningful presentation of the treatment of adult incest survivors in such little space. However, as I read it, I was pleasantly surprised. Each of the six collected...
Critical Incidents in Psychotherapy
The concept of "critical incidents" was developed by Flanagan(1) as a way of identifying behavioral events that have a special relation to some outcome. For example, it has been applied to the identification of behaviors that characterize "effective"...
Developmental Formulation and Psychotherapy of Borderline Adolescents
Borderline adolescents are among the most difficult patients to treat in psychotherapy. This is, in part, due to their intrinsic psychopathology which often involves mistrust, affective instability and dangerous impulsive behavior, significant family...
Freud's Early Clinical Work
Freud spent most of his medical-student years in the physiological laboratory of Professor Brucke. He intended to become a researcher in that area and not a practicing physician. Freud finished his medical studies in 1881, graduating the same year, but...
Health Care Reform: The Entitlement to Psychotherapeutic Services
Reform of our health care system, for years an emotionally charged issue among the general public, has now been assigned priority status by the current administration in Washington. This past year, the President assembled a task force consisting of the...
Indirect Communication as a Therapeutic Technique: A Novel Use of Countertransference
Therapeutic impasse with resistant or highly troubled patients can elicit a variety of countertransference reactions. This paper presents a technique with which therapists can use their countertransference creatively for therapeutic purposes. The novel...
Individual and Group Therapies as Constructive Continuous Experiences
A situation involving continuity between individual and group therapy is problematic. Fortunately, it is dealt with in a recent comprehensive and erudite book by Charles Ashbach and Victor L. Schermer(1) entitled Object Relations, The Self, and the Group....
Normal and Pathological Narcissism in Adolescence
The confusion and contradictions imbuing the psychological world of the adolescent are perhaps surpassed only by the formulations created to explain them. Psychoanalytic writings by Blos(1) and A. Freud(2) state that psychic turmoil and regression are...
Parallel Process in the Supervision of Child Psychotherapy
The development of expertise in child psychotherapy requires growth in both clinical skill and self-awareness. Trainees depend on the guidance of their supervisors to sort through the many complex issues presented by children and their families, to define...
Psychological Interventions for the Suicidal Adolescent
GENERAL OBSERVATIONSIn the psychotherapy of suicidal patients it is necessary for therapists to examine the suicidal episode in the greatest detail against the pull from patients and from within themselves to gloss over these experiences. The ongoing...
Psychotherapy, Neuroscience, and Philosophy of Mind
John Searles, a modern philosopher of mind, asks, "Why do we think of ourselves as mindful, rational, conscious, free agents in a world which science tells us consists entirely of mindless, meaningless, physical particles being influenced by forces in...
Transference-Countertransference Issues with Adolescents: Personal Reflections
INTRODUCTIONPsychotherapeutic work with adolescents is usually fascinating and often frustrating, always creative and frequently confusing. There is no doubt that many adolescents require psychotherapeutic interventions due to developmental stress or...
Variations in Countertransference Reactions in Psychotherapy with Children
INTRODUCTIONWhile the importance of countertransference in psychotherapy with patients usually is acknowledged, relatively little has been written on this subject with reference to work with children. It is only within the last year that a separate volume...