American Journal of Psychotherapy

The American Journal of Psychotherapy is a professional journal covering issues in psychotherapy, including book reviews and software reviews. Founded in 1939, the Association for the Advancement of Psychotherapy publishes the American Journal of Psychotherapy four times a year. Dr. Byram T. Karasu is Editor-in-Chief.

Articles from Vol. 48, No. 4, Fall

A Developmental Metatheory of Psychopathology
INTRODUCTIONIn proposing a metatheory I use the prefix "meta" in its meaning as "more comprehensive, transcending"(1) (p. 745), referring here to the integration of major psychoanalytic schools that have attempted to explore and explain human psychopathology....
A Proposal for Psychiatric Collaboration in Managed Care
A vast amount of research has demonstrated the efficacy of combining psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy in the treatment of psychiatric disorders. Until recently, combined treatment was provided exclusively by psychiatrists. However, with the advent of...
Book Reviews -- Asian Americans: Personality Patterns, Identity, and Mental Health by Laura Uba
It is often asked: Is it possible to characterize a whole people? Yes, we may say, there is something called "national character." Out of common or collective experiences, people tend to develop common attitudes or behavior patterns. At the same time,...
Book Reviews -- Crisis Dreaming: Using Your Dreams to Solve Your Problems by Rosalind Cartwright and Lynne Lamberg
Rosalind Cartwright is a psychologist who is well known for her dream research and Lynne Lamberg is an award-winning journalist who specializes in mental health. They have succeeded in publishing a book that is highly informative and eminently readable....
Book Reviews -- Culture and Human Sexuality: A Reader Edited by David N. Suggs and Andrew W. Miracle
For this volume, Suggs and Miracle have selected a number of pieces, all originally appearing elsewhere, to illustrate various aspects of the anthropology of human sexuality. Their goal in doing so was to elucidate the complex relationship between culture...
Book Reviews -- Death Anxiety Handbook: Research, Instrumentation, and Application Edited by Robert A. Neimeyer
The subject of this book is an important area neglected by the behavioral sciences. Human suffering arises from our awareness of our pain and mortal status. Leo Tolstoy's short story, "The Death of Ivan Ilyich," dramatically shows us death as the ultimate...
Book Reviews -- Family Therapy: Fundamentals of Theory and Practice by William A. Griffin
This small and readable book proposes to introduce the notion of family therapy, and to then present basic concepts of family therapy in a broad manner, and having done so, to refer the reader to advanced reading. It meets its goals.For those perplexed...
Book Reviews -- Forced into Treatment: The Role of Coercion in Clinical Practice (Vol. 137) by the Group for the Advancement of Psychiatry
Tradition holds that psychiatric treatment to be successful must be voluntary. This book shows that coercion is commonly used to get people into treatment and such treatment can be quite successful. What constitutes coercion? Coercion is defined along...
Book Reviews -- Forgotten Memories by Barbara Schave
The sudden eruption of vast numbers of recalled memories of childhood sexual abuse can be attributed to the liberating of such individuals from fear of revelation as this problem has come out of the closet. Conversely its sudden spread also invites comparison...
Book Reviews -- Introduction to Art Therapy: Faith in the Product by Bruce L. Moon
This is the third book authored by Mr. Moon, an accomplished art therapist at Harding Hospital, Worthington, Ohio, and in private practice. He is an Adjunct Faculty Member at Leslie College, Co-Director of the Clinical Internship in Art Therapy and Director...
Book Reviews -- Psychodynamic Psychiatry in Clinical Practice (the DSM-IV Edition) by Glen O. Gabbard
This is the second edition of Gabbard's Psychodynamic Psychiatry in Clinical Practice. The first edition, published in 1990, rapidly became a basic text for psychiatric residency training programs because of its enlightened views on the integration of...
Book Reviews -- Short-Term Parent-Infant Psychotherapy by Paul V. Trad
Research has confirmed that the mother-infant dyadic relationship exerts substantial influence on the course of infant and early-childhood development. In recent years, psychopathology and emotional conflict have been detected with greater frequency...
Book Reviews -- the Dynamics and Treatment of Alcoholism-Essential Papers Edited by Jerome D. Levin and Ronna H. Weiss
The Dynamics and Treatment of Alcoholism is a comprehensive collection of mainly historical papers on the psychodynamic understanding of the addictions and alcoholism in particular. The book will be of interest to practising psychotherapists who work...
Book Reviews -- the Therapeutic Relationship in Behavioural Psychotherapy by Cas Schaap, Ian Bennun, Ludwig Schindler and Kees Hoogduin
This meticulously researched book is a welcome addition to the psychotherapy-process and outcome-research literature. It differs from many other similar works in that it investigates relationship factors in behavioral rather than psychodynamic psychotherapy....
Book Reviews -- Treatment of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (Treatment Manuals for Practitioners Series) by Gail S. Steketee
A manual, by definition, is a book in concise form that contains the rules and principles needed for the mastery of an art or skill. This book, which delineates a behavioral model for treating those who suffer from obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD),...
Book Reviews -- Understanding Depression by Donald Klein and Paul Wender
This book is written for patients suffering from depression as well as for their families. However, it will also be useful to psychiatrists (and other therapists) as a guide to counseling. The basic emphasis is on depression as a biological disease whose...
Book Reviews -- Women Who Hurt Themselves by Dusty Miller
The dramatic diagnostic shift from "borderline" to the family of posttraumatic stress disorders (PTSD's) involved a major shift in clinical formulations with accompanying needs for new theoretical and practical formulations. Women Who Hurt Themselves...
Dungeons and Dragons: The Use of a Fantasy Game in the Psychotherapeutic Treatment of a Young Adult
This article demonstrates how a young man with an obsessional, schizoid personality was treated by utilizing a fantasy game, Dungeons and Dragons, as a vehicle for releasing his unconscious fantasies. It aims to show how the game may serve to free fears...
Erik H. Erikson (1902-1994)
When Erik H. Erikson died recently at the age of 91, he had achieved world renown as a scholar of the behavioral sciences, his contributions ranging from psychology to anthropology. Moreover, his two biographies, one of Ghandi, the other a Pulitzer-Prize...
Personality Disorders: Model for Conceptual Approach and Classification-Part II: Proposed Classification
INTRODUCTIONIn Part I of this article (Vol.47, No. 4, pp. 558-571, this Journal) we presented data supporting the hypothesis that one core deficit in personality (referred to as the borderline level of functioning) represents a common dimension extending...
Principles of Supportive Psychotherapy
INTRODUCTIONFrom a conceptual point of view supportive psychotherapy can be understood as occupying one end of a continuing spectrum of therapeutic interaction, with expressive therapy at the other end. As one approaches the midpoint of this spectrum...
Review of Research in Supportive Psychotherapy: An Update
Supportive psychotherapy is probably the most common form of psychotherapy used for patients in acute crisis situations and for those with more chronic psychopathology who show severe and persistent ego deficits and defects. It has been used, for example,...
Role of Theory in Teaching Supportive Psychotherapy
INTRODUCTIONThe most commonly used form of individual dynamic psychotherapy practiced in the United States is usually designated as psychoanalytically oriented psychotherapy, insight-oriented psychotherapy, expressive therapy, or long-term exploratory...
Self Psychology, Object Relations Theory and Supportive Psychotherapy
Long neglected in the clinical literature, supportive psychotherapy, of late, has begun to receive overdue and much-needed attention.(1-3) An ubiquitous psychotherapeutic treatment, it is surprising that it had been so ignored from an academic perspective...
Supportive Psychotherapy of the Schizophrenic Patient
INTRODUCTIONCurrent treatment of the schizophrenic patient focuses on psychopharmacology, social skills training, vocational rehabilitation, and supportive family interventions. As a total treatment plan two elements are missing. There is no executive...
The Voice of Reason
Each day we learn more about the disturbing wave of child abuse that appears to be engulfing our nation. Over time, the reports have grown increasingly more lurid and graphic to include infants abandoned in garbage dumpsters or children held prisoner...
Violence in Patients with Narcissistic Personality Pathology: Observations of a Clinical Series
Assessing patients who may be at risk to commit violent acts toward themselves or others remains one of the most compelling, yet frustrating and painful tasks facing clinicians. It is only too well established that the ability of mental health practitioners...