American Journal of Psychotherapy

The American Journal of Psychotherapy is a professional journal covering issues in psychotherapy, including book reviews and software reviews. Founded in 1939, the Association for the Advancement of Psychotherapy publishes the American Journal of Psychotherapy four times a year. Dr. Byram T. Karasu is Editor-in-Chief.

Articles from Vol. 63, No. 4, 2009

Advances in Psychotherapy for Children and Adolescents with Eating Disorders
There is a significant lag in the development of evidence based approaches for eating disorders in children and adolescents despite the fact that these disorders typically onset during these developmental periods. Available studies suggest that psychotherapy...
The Role of Body Image in Pediatric Illness: Therapeutic Challenges and Opportunities
The body image is the individual's mental representation of his own body, a representation that encompasses both perceptual and ideational components. In this paper I will explore the concept of body image, its development and its relationship to self-image...
The Supporting Alliance in Child and Adolescent Treatment: Enhancing Collaboration among Therapists, Parents, and Teachers
Research indicates that the therapeutic alliance between therapist and pediatric patient is most effective in the context of a productive supporting alliance-an alliance encompassing the network of relationships among therapists, parents and teachers....
The Well Sibling: Challenges and Possibilities
The impact on the family of a child with serious mental illness or some other form of disability has been well documented by many authors. Contributing to this impact is society's attitude to mental disabilities, which has been ambivalent and marginalizing...
Working with Parents: Implications for Individual Psychotherapeutic Work with Children and Adolescents
Child psychotherapists recognize that working with parents is an indispensable part of working individually with child and adolescent patients. Children and adolescents are typically referred by their parents or other concerned adults. What tends to...