American Journal of Psychotherapy

The American Journal of Psychotherapy is a professional journal covering issues in psychotherapy, including book reviews and software reviews. Founded in 1939, the Association for the Advancement of Psychotherapy publishes the American Journal of Psychotherapy four times a year. Dr. Byram T. Karasu is Editor-in-Chief.

Articles from Vol. 61, No. 2, 2007

Borderline Attributions
Borderline personality disorder is characterized as an identity disturbance or pathology of the self-structure. The author employs concepts from deconstruction philosophy and object relations theory to explore how persons with borderline personality...
Horror Films: Tales to Master Terror or Shapers of Trauma?
The authors review the literature of cinematic-related psychiatric case reports and report the case of a 22-year-old woman who presented with intrusive thoughts of demonic possession and flashbacks of the film The Exorcist. Cinematic neurosis may be...
Levels and Patterns of the Therapeutic Alliance in Brief Psychotherapy
We examined the relevance of the level and pattern of the therapeutic alliance in 44 cases of three different, manualized 30-session treatments using patient ratings of the Working Alliance Inventory after each session. It was hypothesized that both...
Recovering from an Extramarital Relationship from a Non-Systemic Approach
According to some systemic thinkers, extramarital affairs are a joint venture between spouses. In an attempt to revitalize an emotionally depleted marriage, partners choose to triangulate a third party, and thus generate a crisis in the marriage. From...
Reflective Listening in Counseling: Effects of Training Time and Evaluator Social Skills
Psychology students received a 14-, 28-, or 42-hour training course in reflective listening. Before and after training the students participated in role-played counseling conversations with confederates, who rated them. The conversations were captured...
The Psychotherapy of Schizophrenia through the Lens of Phenomenology: Intersubjectivity and the Search for the Recovery of First- and Second-Person Awareness
Phenomenological analyses suggest that persons with schizophrenia have profound difficulties with meaningfully engaging the world and situating a sense of self intersubjectively, which leads to the experience of self as absent. In this paper we explore...
Therapeutic Storytelling Revisited
This article (a) relates the many beneficial features that employing stories in psychotherapy can have, (b) offers guidelines for presenting clarifying and applying them to patients' unique situations, and (c) presents a sample of therapeutic stories...