American Journal of Psychotherapy

The American Journal of Psychotherapy is a professional journal covering issues in psychotherapy, including book reviews and software reviews. Founded in 1939, the Association for the Advancement of Psychotherapy publishes the American Journal of Psychotherapy four times a year. Dr. Byram T. Karasu is Editor-in-Chief.

Articles from Vol. 51, No. 4, Fall

An Object-Relational Interpretation of Thomas Mann's "Death in Venice"
CARRIE ZLOTNICK-WOLDENBERG, M.A.J The protagonist of Thomas Mann's novella "Death in Venice" is examined in terms of object-relational theory. Splitting, his primary defense mechanism, which is employed both intrapsychically and interpersonally, is discussed...
Developing Cultural Competence: Contributions from Recent Family Therapy Literature
EVAN IMBER-BLACK, Ph.D.* Recently, a psychiatric resident came to me expressing concern. A married couple he was seeing for couple's therapy kept showing up for therapy with the husband's mother, who insisted on joining the sessions. The young husband...
Guidelines for the Treatment of Adults Abused or Possibly Abused as Children (with Attention to Issues of Delayed/recovered Memory)
These guidelines** provide practicing clinicians with information regarding psychotherapy with adults who (1) disclose an abuse history (physical, sexual, emotional) at the beginning of therapy; (2) do not disclose abuse despite having knowledge and...
Healing the Incest Wound: A Treatment Update with Attention to Recovered-Memory Issues
CHRISTINE A. COURTOIS, Ph.D.* This article provides an updated treatment model for adults who report having experienced incestuous abuse in childhood. It integrates psychodynamic, traumatic stress, developmental and feminist formulations, accords greater...
Masochism Revisited: Reflections on Masochism and Its Childhood Antecendents
Masochism Revisited: Reflections on Masochism and Its Childhood Antecedents* NATALIE SHAINESS, M.D.** Masochism, originally described as sexual perversion by Sacher von Masoch, was elaborated by Freud to include personality pathology, and further developed...
Psychotherapy: Some Guiding Principles
WALTER M. HAAS, M.S.W, B.C.D.* It is said that the older you get, the wiser you get because you begin to realize that there are more questions out there than there are answers. Nevertheless, based on a long career in psychotherapy, I will risk listing...
Short-Term Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy with Obsessive Preadolescents
CHARALAMBOS S. IERODIAKONOU, M.D.* IOANNA IERODIAKONOU-BENOU, M.D.** The phenomenological and psychodynamic differences between obsessive preadolescents and obsessive adults are pointed out. Case material shows how an effective therapeutic alliance on...
Transcendence and Imminence in Psychotherapy
RICHARD H. COX, Ph.D., M.D., D. Min.* The traditional dilemma of the compatibility of religion and psychotherapy is discussed within the context of maturing beyond the language and behavior of the imminent, i.e., the here-and-now. Transcendence is presented...
Value-Sensitive Therapy: Learning from Ultra-Orthodox Patients
SAMUEL C. HEILMAN, Ph.D.* ELIEZER WITZTUM, M.D.** This paper explores the issues that arise when psychotherapists and patients do not share a common value system. Using three case studies of ultraOrthodox Jewish patients who hold religious values and...
Working through the Experience of Time in Time-Limited Therapy
ILANA LAOR, M.A.* MICHEL GRANEK, M.D.** The experience of time is a component in the psychic reality that can be understood from four standpoints: the cognitive, the dynamic, the existentialaffective, and the life-span linked. This article presents a...