Brigham Young University Law Review

Brigham Young University Law Review is a magazine focusing on Law

Articles from Vol. 2012, No. 6, 2012

A Failure to Communicate
On Tuesday night, December 12, 2000, at about 10:00 p.m. eastern time, the Supreme Court released its decision in Bush v. Gore} We all vividly remember the image of reporters standing outside the Supreme Court rumbling with copies of the opinion and...
Cameras at the Supreme Court: A Rhetorical Analysis
"Every citizen should know what the law is, how it came into existence, what relation its form bears to its substance, and how it gives to society its fibre and strength and poise of frame.I. INTRODUCTIONFor most of the Supreme Court's history, a story...
Cameras in the Courtroom in the Twenty-First Century: The U.S. Supreme Court Learning from Abroad?
I. INTRODUCTIONThe ongoing revolution in the communication technology of the twenty-first century has had little effect on the U.S. federal courts in general and on the Supreme Court of the United States in particular. The Supreme Court has never allowed...
Moving beyond Cameras in the Courtroom: Technology, the Media, and the Supreme Court
I. INTRODUCTIONNews media, legal blogs, and law reviews routinely cite a panoply of reasons why the Supreme Court will not permit the televising or videotaping of oral arguments: the Justices' desire for anonymity, ' the risk that creative editing of...
Not a Free Press Court?
I. INTRODUCTIONThe last decade has been tumultuous for print and broadcast media. Daily newspaper circulation continues to fall precipitously, magazines struggle to survive, and network television audiences keep shrinking.1 On the other hand, cable news...
Supreme Court Oral Argument Video: A Review of Media Effects Research and Suggestions for Study
I. INTRODUCTIONAs the U.S. Supreme Court prepared to hear three days of oral argument about the constitutionality of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act in early 2012,1 C-SPAN co-founder and CEO Brian P. Lamb wrote a letter to Chief Justice...
The Justices and News Judgment: The Supreme Court as News Editor
In 2011, in Snyder v. Phelps, the military funeral protest case involving the Westboro Baptist Church, the United States Supreme Court again warned that courts needed to protect speech broadly, lest judges become what the Court called "inadvertent censors."1...
The Monster in the Courtroom
"There are very few monsters who warrant the fear we have of them.It is well known that Supreme Court Justices are not fans of cameras - specifically, video cameras.2 Despite continued pressure from the press,3 Congress,4 and the public5 to allow cameras...
The Press, the Public, and the U.S. Supreme Court
The 2012 BYU Law Review Symposium, "The Press, the Public, and the U.S. Supreme Court," brought together prominent national reporters who regularly cover the United States Supreme Court and top scholars from the fields of law, communications, and political...
U.S. Supreme Court Justices and Press Access
I. INTRODUCTIONScholars and commentators have long noted the strained relationship between the United States Supreme Court and the media that wishes to report upon its work.1 The press corps complains that the Court is cloistered, elitist, and unbending...