Journal of Film and Video

Journal of Film and Video is a magazine focusing on Film and Video

Articles from Vol. 50, No. 1, Spring

Cinematic Inscriptions of Otherness: Sounding a Critique of Subjectivity
The films of Bernardo Bertolucci engage in a persistent critique of the essentialist subject. La Luna (1979), for instance, presents an explicit example of the director's analysis of the subject's problematic search for a fixed maternal image that might...
From the Script Editor
Screenwritng is an art form in its infancy. Film itself is a toddler struggling for intellectual respect in a family of ancient siblings. Prose, poetry, theater, dance, sculpture, and painting have been around for so much longer than cinema, no wonder...
History Revenged: Monty Python Translates Chretien De Troyes's Perceval, or the Story of the Grail (Again)
Literature, film, culture, and intercultural communications courses are ideal venues in which to expose students to such classical texts as Chretien de Troyes's Perceval, or the Story of the Grail, from which centuries of grail material developed. The...
Hollywood's Dark Cinema: The American Film Noir
Palmer, R. Barton, Hollywood's Dark Cinema: The American Film Noir. New York: Twayne, 1994, 206 pp., $15.95 (paper). R. Barton Palmer's Hollywood's Dark Cinema: The American Film Noir serves as either a separate critical introduction or a complementary...
Humanity
Humanity, directed by Ted Hardin, 1996, 60 minutes. Available in 16mm. Distributed by Ted Hardin Productions. Ted Hardin's film Humanity is an adaptation of Die Menschen, a play written by Walter Hasenclever in 1918. Hasenclever was a German expressionist...
The Eye in the Object: Identification and Surveillance in Samuel Beckett's Screen Dramas
It is one thing to say that the film viewer identifies with characters, actors, and filmmakers. It is another to say that the viewer identifies with the camera. The latter idea reflects the critical difference Christian Metz introduced when he described...
The Image of the Other and the Other Dances with Wolves: The Refigured Indian and the Textual Supplement
Lieutenant John J. Dunbar (Kevin Costner) and the teamster Timmons (Robert Pastorelli) are already far along on their way to Fort Sedgewick, on the Indian frontier, when Dunbar asks, "How come we haven't seen any buffalo?" "You can't figure the stinkin'...