Teaching Exceptional Children

Teaching Exceptional Children is a journal that explores practical methods for teaching students who have exceptionalities and those who are gifted and talented. Since it was founded in 1956, it is published six times a year. The journal is published by the Council for Exceptional Children.Subjects for Teaching Exceptional Children include education. The editors are Alec Peck and Stan Scarpati.

Articles from Vol. 29, No. 4, March/April

Blueprints for Learning: Using Cognitive Frameworks for Understanding
Using Cognitive Frameworks for Understanding You have just finished teaching what you feel was a great lesson and you decide to check student comprehension of the material by asking a series of questions. To your astonishment, you find that students...
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By What Token Ecomony?: A Classroom Learning Tool for Inclusive Settings
In society, speeders get tickets or lose their licenses; in this classroom, children with appropriate behavior get license plates, and those who violate class rules lose their license plates. Gather enough license plates, and you could go out to lunch....
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CHILD-PACs Make for Happy Families
Rubber duckies linger foods Soap crayons Tape recorders Lullabies Picture books What do all these items have in common? They are surprises found in CHILD-PACs, innovative teaching-learning, take-home materials for infants and toddlers and their families....
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Enriching Assessment: Using Varied Assessments for Diverse Leaners
"Now do you know?" "How did you come up with that response?" "How have you improved?" "Tell me about what you did." "Tell me what you learned." Teachers can ask questions like these in interviews with children, in portfolio reviews, during observations,...
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From School Grounds to Coffee Grounds: An Introduction to School-Based Enterprises
Espresso On the Go-and the students are in charge! The Northwest is well known for its passion for fine coffee. Over the past several years, espresso bars have sprung up on almost every street corner. Many school districts in Oregon have turned this...
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Learning through Rhyme
"That's a bad fat cat." And kids love it. Teachers of young children with disabilities need a host of innovative ideas when creating lesson plans for their classrooms. A whole language focus is beneficial for most children; however, some children need...
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Let's Learn Contractions!
These words describe contraction lessons-and results-in a "contracted" sentence. Secondgrade students who were reading at the first-grade level have experienced success with the fast-paced lessons described here, And they have gone on to enjoy the world...
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Parents Exhibit Children's Progress at a Poster Session
It is near the end of the school year. The normally hectic atmosphere at the Fred S. Keller School heightens as the parents prepare their poster boards for the annual poster session. Scissors, rulers, pencils, fluorescent paper, and pleasant chatter...
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Partner in Enrichment: Preparing Teachers for Multiple Ability Classrooms
Imagine first-year teachers who provide enrichment through instruction that is learner centered and hands on and that challenges students' creative and critical thinking. Also imagine that these teachers are providing such enrichment to all students...
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Reading and Writing with Help from Story Grammar
This is a quiz: What do all these items have in common? And what on earth do they have to do with grammar? Well, everything is the answer. Just as English grammar reflects the structure of the language, so story grammar reflects the structure of a story....
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Self-Talk: Strategies for Success in Math
Students with learning disabilities can experience success with math-at last! This article shows one way to turn the failure cycle into a success cycle, through learning strategies and positive attributions. B. J. had experienced difficulty with math...
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Social Skills: Part Two.Adolescence through Work Life
If a child's social skills are still inadequate by the time he or she reaches adolescence, the deficiency can have a life-long impact. In developing relationships or entering the job market, adequate social skills take on increasing importance. The following...
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Successful Ability Awareness Programs: The Key Is in the Planning
Ability awareness programs are designed for people of all ages and are related to all challenges (physical, cognitive, sensory, social-emotional) faced by students with special needs. Such programs have several intended results: To foster greater understanding...
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Success with Reading and Spelling: Students Internalize Words through Structured Lessons
Thirteen years ago, when I first started teaching in the Cleveland Public Schools, I was assigned a junior high reading class for students with learning disabilities and inadvertently discovered that many of my students with learning disabilities couldn't...
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Think While You Spell: A Cognitive Motivational Approach to Spelling Instruction
Here's an important spelling list: Self-reinforcement Chaining Reasonable goals Test-teach Tutor-tutee Enthusiasm Attributions Job applications Think-alouds Graphing Write these words down in your spelling journal; use them in sentences. First, though,...
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What about Our Schools, Our Languages
When I came to the United States, I was excited about the chance to go to school and make new friends. However, I didn't speak much English and the other students made fun of me. They laughed at my accent, my clothes, and the difficulties I had understanding...
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