Anglican Theological Review

The Anglican Theological Review is a quarterly journal devoted to theological reflection. The Anglican Theological Review includes peer-reviewed essays and articles of interest to the Anglican community, including articles on the arts, philosophy, and sciences.

Articles from Vol. 92, No. 3, Summer

A Dim Mirror: Archbishop Rowan Williams's Reflections on the 2009 General Convention
This article examines "Communion, Covenant, and our Anglican Future," Archbishop Rowan Williams's essay on the 2009 General Convention of the Episcopal Church, in which he addresses legislation concerning the ordination of partnered gay clergy and the...
Editor's Notes
In the beginning was the Word: words, images, gestures all creale, enliven, challenge, and form worlds. Christian faith depends on Gods self-expression and consequently on the words, images, and gestures in which human life is always immersed. All of...
Expressing What Christians Believe: Anglican Principles for Liturgical Revision
What principles have guided liturgical revision in the Anglican Communion? This essay attempts to address that question for each of four historical periods, as well as offer suggestions for future revision. The author asserts that we cannot simply forge...
Logos and Dia-Logos: Faith, Reason, (and Love) According to Joseph Ratzinger
Reason is a feature that distinguishes Christianity from other religions, as Joseph Ratzinger so often said. The position of religion, as the Jewish-Christian perspective teaches and he stated many times, is positive and complementary: faith admits the...
Rick Warren Meets Gregory Dix: The Liturgical Movement Comes Knocking at the Megachurch Door
The movement commonly called "the emerging church" arose out of the evangelical megachurches, where members-especially younger members-increasingly sought an affective, symbolic, and non-dogmatic style of worship. The emerging church arises out of postmodernism's...
Wider, Broader, Richer: Trinitarian Theology and Ministerial Order
Developing expressions of ministry are evident across the Anglican Communion. This paper seeks to address the "crisis in ministry," as some call it, by offering a theology of relational ministry fitting with these culturally diverse developments. Drawing...