Anglican Theological Review

The Anglican Theological Review is a quarterly journal devoted to theological reflection. The Anglican Theological Review includes peer-reviewed essays and articles of interest to the Anglican community, including articles on the arts, philosophy, and sciences.

Articles from Vol. 92, No. 2, Spring

Baptism as the Model for a Sacramental Aesthetic
When Christians of different traditions talk about what they share in faith and practice, at the top of the list would be the universal sacrament of baptism in the Name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit. In the light of this, there...
Editor's Notes
This issue of the Anglican Theological Review comprises a set of essays that are not particularly related thematically. Surveying this sort of broad landscape can give us a glimpse of possibilities that both intrigue us and extend our perspective beyond...
Evolutionary-Emergent Worldview and Anglican Theological Revision: Case Studies from the 1920s
This essay explores the theological work of Anglicans in the 1920s in response to the changes in intellectual culture brought about by "emergence" interpretations of evolutionary theory. Exploring the theologies of prominent Modernists and liberal Anglo-Catholics,...
Healing Broken Bodies: The Missional Ecclesiology Behind J. H. Oldham's Middle Axioms
This essay explores J. H. Oldham's development of the middle axiom approach, in particular the missioned ecclesiology that framed it, found in the publications he developed for the Oxford Conference in 1937 on "Church, Community, and State." With this...
Myself: Walt Whitman's Political, Theological Creature
Examining Walt Whitman's poem "Song of Myself" (from his 1855 collection Leaves of Grass), this article expounds upon the subject formation contained within it: the self. This self, developed through a variant of creation myth, is inflected with both...
The Breath of Life: Christian Perspectives on Conception and Ensoulment
Is "human life" strictly a biological phenomenon measured from the moment when sperm and egg combine? Or does "human life" not actually begin until the immaterial aspect known as "the soul" appears at some indeterminate point? This essay examines the...
The Elusive Identity
Discussed in this essay:Chapman, Mark D., ed. The Anglican Covenant: Unity and Diversity in the Anglican Communion. London: Mowbray, 2008.Avis, Paul. The Identity of Anglicanism; Essentials of Anglican Ecclesiology. London: T & T Clark, 2007.The...