Journalism History

Publication covering history and analysis of journalism.

Articles from Vol. 36, No. 4, Winter

"Always Plenty": Editor-Writer Bill Emerson's Speeches as a Memoir of a Rare Life and Times
This is the eleventh in a series of articles on archival collections of interest to mass communication historians. Readers of Journalism History are invited to suggest collections that they would like to see appear in future articles, and the editors...
Liberty Hyde Bailey, Agricultural Journalism, and the Making of the Moral Landscape
Liberty Hyde Bailey (1858-1954) was a prominent horticulturist, professor, rural reformer, and author. As an agricultural writer, who poured out his sentiments and his science in more than seventy books and countless articles for professional journals...
Objectivity's Prophet: Adolph S. Ochs and the New York Times, 1896-1935
Historians of American journalism have shown considerable interest in the ideal of objectivity. Although scholars disagree on the precise meaning of it and the timing of its rise, the standard historiographical assumption is that objectivity emerged...
Pressing the Press: W.E. Chilton III's Investigation of Newspaper Owners
During twenty-five years as owner/publisher of West Virginia's largest newspaper, the Charleston Gazette, W.E. Chilton III developed a journalism philosophy that he called "sustained outrage." Newspapers too often failed, he argued to the Southern Newspaper...
Reporting on Party Spirit: The Western Spy's Coverage of the March to Ohio Statehood
The Western Spy, a weekly newspaper published by Joseph Carpenter, first appeared in Cincinnati in 1799, four years before Ohio became a state. This article examines the Spy's coverage of Northwest Territory politics and the statehood movement from May...
The Eagle and the Sun: Shaping Press Philosophy in Early Mexico, 1823-27
Two newspapers, El Sol and the Águila Mejicana, became the dominant media forces in Mexico in the years immediately following independence from Spain. Although they were notorious rivals, their discourse and their practices showed similar attitudes about...