Journalism History

Publication covering history and analysis of journalism.

Articles from Vol. 19, No. 4, Winter

Book Reviews -- Covering the Body: The Kennedy Assassination, the Media, and the Shaping of Collective Memory by Barbie Zelizer
The days surrounding November 22, 1963, have generated and continue to spawn articles, books, documentaries, films, and ritualistic television memorials. These have come from former Kennedy administration insiders, popular historians, journalists, conspiracy...
Book Reviews -- Fifties Television by William Boddy / Make Room for TV by Lynn Spigel
With 500-channel interactive media networks and an "electronic superhighway" on the horizon, an issue in television historiography is the relevance of TV's two-network early period. While quite different in approach, the works of William Boddy and Lynn...
Book Reviews -- Forward Positions Edited by Betsy Wade with a Foreword by Harrison E. Salisbury
Those who served as ordinary soldiers in the combat zones of World War II remember Ernie Pyle as the correspondent who best described the war we experienced. His widely syndicated stories told millions of Americans the unvarnished truth about what it...
Book Reviews -- Freedom of the Press: Constitutional Issues by Bernard Schwartz
In Freedom of the Press: Constitutional Issues, Bernard Schwartz, a professor of law at New York University, examines the U.S. Supreme Court's positions on freedom of the press as a legal and hybrid sociopolitical, economic, and cultural institution--"one...
Book Reviews -- Printers in Appalachia: The International Printing Pressmen and Assistants' Union of North America, 1907-1967 by Jack Mooney
Jack Mooney's 193-page book, Printers in Appalachia, is not a treatise on the history of printing in Appalachia, nor even in Tennessee. It is not a "how-to" book on the intricacies of operating large presses. Instead, it is a book that relates what one...
Book Reviews -- Ranks and Columns: Armed Forces Newspapers in American Wars by Alfred Emile Cornebise
Most of us would be hard pressed to name more than one military newspaper. Some cynics may even regard the phrase as an oxymoron. Either way, this slice of specialized journalism has, to use the cliche, been ignored in the literature of journalism. The...
Book Reviews -- Reading Football: How the Popular Press Created an American Spectacle by Michael Oriard
This review was written on January 23, 1994, a day on which well over 100 million Americans either watched one of the two National Football League playoff games, or were interested enough to view or read coverage of these games later.The ubiquitous role...
Book Reviews -- the Ambivalent Welcome: Print Media, Public Opinion and Immigration by Rita J. Simon and Susan H. Alexander
Believers in the jolly old Melting Pot image of a welcoming and democratic United States will find it painful to wade through the carefully documented book by Rita J. Simon and Susan H. Alexander. It illustrates how unwelcoming the American press has...
Book Reviews -- the Early Black Press in America, 1827 to 1860 by Frankie Hutton
The U.S. black press has been woefully underresearched by mass communications historians, and the problem has been compounded by the fact that much of the research has been shallow and/or biased. It simply is not dependable. Thus, it is of note when...
Book Reviews -- the News under Russia's Old Regime by Louise McReynolds
For years, one of the dominant trends in western historiography was to show how the 1917 Bolshevik revolution in Russia was an inevitable outcome of a series of events in which social change and socialist thought were preeminent. If the mass media received...
"Nonpublicity" and the Unmaking of a President: William Howard Taft and the Ballinger-Pinchot Controversy of 1909-1910
William Howard Taft may have been the last American President to take office without intending to seek public support by cultivating the press. During his single term, from 1909 to 1913, he eschewed the tactics of managing presidential news coverage...
Reconsidering Harvest of Shame: The Limitations of a Broadcast Journalism Landmark
In the years since it first aired, Harvest of Shame has become one of the seminal markers of television journalism history.(1) CBS broadcast the documentary on Friday, November 25, 1960. Airing during prime time on the night after Thanksgiving, the one-hour...