Journalism History

Publication covering history and analysis of journalism.

Articles from Vol. 20, No. 2, Summer

A Constructivist's View of an Earthquake: Edith Irvine Photographs San Francisco 1906
When she stepped from a packet boat onto a San Francisco dock on April 18, 1906, 22-year-old Edith Irvine made a swift decision to change her travel plans. Instead of embarking on a world tour, she stayed in San Francisco to photograph the devastation...
Book Reviews -- A Sacred Trust: Nelson Poynter and the St. Petersburg Times by Robert N. Pierce
Robert N. Pierce's exhaustively researched book tells the important story of one of the most influential newspaper publishers of the twentieth century and the paper he elevated to among the nation's elite. Nelson Poynter owned the St. Petersburg Times...
Book Reviews -- Bylines in Despair: Herbert Hoover, the Great Depression, and the U.S. News Media by Louis W. Liebovich
Liebovich's study of Herbert Hoover's relations with the press during his years is Europe's emergency food coordinator, secretary of commerce, and president benefits from considerable detective work in the print media of the period. His conclusion that...
Book Reviews -- from Enemy to Ally: Japan, the American Business Press, and the Early Cold War by James F. Hilgenberg Jr
American businesses looking to eastern Europe as an investment opportunity learned quickly that every government has a different definition for two terms: democracy and economic reform. They also learned that, in the hierarchy of importance to a population,...
Book Reviews -- Liberal Journalism and American Education, 1914-1941 by James M. Wallace
Be warned: read the title of this book carefully. This is not a book about journalism education or the education of American journalists. It is a history of the coverage or, better, a commentary on American education in the pages of two liberal journals...
Book Reviews -- Nellie Bly: Daredevil, Reporter, Feminist by Brooke Kroeger
While journalist Brooke Kroeger's new biography of Nellie Bly does much to debunk the myths and legends surrounding the nineteenth century's celebrated stunt journalist, it also raises questions that remain unanswered because of the paucity of sources....
Book Reviews -- One Nation under Television: The Rise and Decline of Network TV (2Nd Ed.) by J. Fred MacDonald
Television has been a fertile ground for mass communications scholars. Its inception, development, and rise to a dominant position among mass media have been studied from historical, political, economic, social, technical, and psychological perspectives....
Book Reviews -- Subjugated Knowledges: Journalism, Gender and Literature in the Nineteenth Century by Laurel Brake
Recent news events in the United States have renewed the debate about tabloid journalism: Is the "journalism" that appears in tabloids worthy of intelligent, educated people? Can readers believe what is published in these newspapers?As Laurel Brake illustrates...
Book Reviews -- the Press Gang: Newspapers and Politics, 1865-1878 by Mark Wahlgren Summers
Mark Wahlgren Summers argues that the Bohemian Brigade did not fade away at the end of the Civil War. Instead, the personal, colorful--and often venal--journalism pioneered by Civil War special correspondents became a model for Gilded Age Washington...
Book Reviews -- the Unseen Power: Public Relations, A History by Scott M. Cutlip
Scott M. Cutlip, dean emeritus at the University of Georgia's Henry W. Grady College of Journalism and Mass Communication, has focused this lengthy work on some of the key leaders of early public relations agencies and their contribution to the development...
Book Reviews -- Vance Packard and American Social Criticism by Daniel Horowitz
Every college student of the 1950s and 1960s knew the works of Vance Packard, and while they may not have consciously shared in the perceived social ills that were his subjects, they recognized that there was something vaguely uneven about the author...
Book Reviews -- Violence against the Press: Policing the Public Sphere in U.S. History by John Nerone
The fact that violence against the press has existed throughout much of American history is an apparent paradox. How can a people who extol freedom of the press condone infringements on that freedom? Yet many have. Nerone cautions against relegating...
Christian Journalism's Finest Hour?: An Analysis of the Failure of the National Courier and Inspiration
When the biweekly tabloid National Courier debuted in 1975, one of its editors claimed that the publication represented "Christian journalism's finest hour."(1) An Associated Press report said the Courier was "a different kind of national newspaper,...
Electronic Media Reviews -- Declining Standards in TV News: Is It All Television's Fault? (Program 2) Featuring Phil Balboni, Walter Jacobson, David Bartlett, Howard Kurtz, Bob Herbert, Jane Hall and Ken Auletta
This, the second of three panel discussions on declining standards in television news, features Phil Balboni of the Hearst Corporation as moderator, Walter Jacobson, news anchor WFLD, Chicago, David Bartlett, president of RTNDA, and Howard Kurtz, media...
Electronic Media Reviews -- Quiz Show Directed by Robert Redford
Robert Redford's "Quiz Show" represents the ultimate morality play. By portraying an episode of American media history in which deception and deceit were the norm, we are provided with ample material for classroom discussion. But it is when "Quiz Show"...
Elma "Pem" Gardner Farnsworth: The Pioneering of Television
Philo T. Farnsworth, the "father of television"(1) gave to the world the most powerful communications form of the century, "unparalled in scientific development".(2) However, in the quest to bestow recognition on Farnsworth, historians have overlooked...