Journal of Cognitive Psychotherapy

Journal of Cognitive Psychotherapy is a journal offering case studies, theory and research papers, articles specifying the clinical implications of topical research, and literature reviews on clinical topics in all aspects of cognitive psychotherapy. Since it was founded in 1987, it is printed quarterly. The journal is published by Springer Publishing Co.Subjects for Journal of Cognitive Psychotherapy include social programs and psychology and psychiatry. The editor in chief is Steven Taylor.

Articles from Vol. 11, No. 2, 1997

Cognitive-Behavioral Interventions with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: A Single Case Study
Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) is a disorder characterized by disabling fatigue often causing a reduction in daily activities and depressed mood. Individuals struggling with CFS have been noted to have maladaptive automatic thoughts that interfere with...
Cognitive-Behavior Therapy and the Dialogue of Science
COGNITIVE-BEHAVIOR THERAPY AND THE DIALOGUE OF SCIENCE The Science and Practice of Cognitive Behaviour Therapy D. M. Clark & C. G. Fairburn (Eds.), Oxford, England: Oxford University Press, 1997,437 pp. $47.50 (paperback).D. M. Clark and C. G. Fairburn...
Cognitive Psychotherapy and Postmodernism: Emerging Themes and Challenges
Implications of postmodern thought for the theory and practice of cognitive psychotherapy are examined in light of three postmodern influences-social constructionism, feminism, and multiculturalism. It is suggested that these influences challenge cognitive...
Cognitive Therapy on the Brink of Erasure: Notes from the Postmodern Underground
Lyddon and Weill (in this issue) attempt an impossible task, i.e., to describe, explicate, and defend an epochal shift in recent history from modernism to postmodernism-a shift as radical and transformative as that between the classic and medieval epochs....
Is Cognitive Therapy Ill-Founded? A Commentary on Lyddon and Weill
Lyddon and Weill (in this issue) have concluded that constructivism is preferred over standard cognitive theory and therapy because the latter is based on postmodern assumptions about knowledge, reality and the self. They argue that the postmodern basis...
Marrying Postmodernism with Cognitive Psychotherapy: A Response to Lyddon and Weill
Cognitive psychologists and psychotherapists are saddled with a difficult task as they confront the challenges of postmodernism. Lyddon and Weill are no exception- despite their admirable struggle with the challenges that confront them. In brief, the...
Postmodern Cognitive Psychotherapy: From the University to the Multiversity
In this article the author rejoins Lyddon and Weill's position on cognitive psychotherapy and postmodernism by defending the proposition that the contextual conditions of postmodern society challenge cognitive psychotherapy to introduce significant changes...
Postmodern Cognitive Psychotherapy: Moving beyond Modernist Dualisms
Despite their range of reactions, the rejoinders to Lyddon and Weill's article (in this issue) converge on two fundamental issues facing cognitive psychotherapists in the postmodern era: (1) the relation between human knowing and reality and (2) contrasting...