Texas Law Review

Edited and published by the students at the University of Texas School of Law, the Texas Law Review is a leading publication of legal scholarship. Texas Law Review contains articles by professors, judges, and practitioners, in addition to reviews, essays, commentaries, and student notes.

Articles from Vol. 80, No. 6, May

A Tale of Three Markets: The Law and Economics of Predatory Lending
Articles Predatory lending-exploitative high-cost loans to naive borrowers-- has dominated the headlines in recent years and has sent foreclosure rates soaring.' There is fierce debate over how best to respond to this surge in predatory lending.2 Too...
Ending the Revolution
Ending the Revolution THE FUTURE OF IDEAS: THE FATE OF THE COMMONS IN A CONNECTED WORLD. By Lawrence Lessig.^ New York: Random House, 2001. Pp. x, 333. $30.00. COPYRIGHTS AND COPYWRONGS: THE RISE OF INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY AND How IT THREATENS CREATIVITY....
Federal Sovereign Immunity and Compensatory Contempt
Notes Federal Sovereign Immunity and Compensatory Contempt^ No man in this country is so high that he is above the law. No officer of the law may set that law at defiance with impunity. All the officers of the government, from the highest to the lowest,...
ICTY Provisional Release: Current Practice, a Dissenting Voice, and the Case for a Rule Change
Commentary ICTY^ Provisional Release: Current Practice, a Dissenting Voice, and the Case for a Rule Change All trials must contain an element of risk-namely, the risk that the accused is freed. If this aspect is missing, what we have is a show trial.1...
Sales of In-Game Assets: An Illustration of the Continuing Failure of Intellectual Property Law to Protect Digial-Content Creators
Sales of In-Game Assets: An Illustration of the Continuing Failure of Intellectual Property Law to Protect Digital-Content Creators^ I. Introduction Technological innovation outpaces legal innovation.1 This rule rings even more true in the digital age,...
Third-Party Interests in Criminal Law
The U.S. Department of Justice will sometimes decline to prosecute health care fraud if the conviction would diminish health care resources for patients and communities. Environmental crimes may go unprosecuted if third parties would be comparably harmed...