Musical Times

A quarterly publication that covers topics in classical music and includes an extensive archive of obituaries of leading musicians.

Articles from Vol. 144, No. 1883, Summer

Alongside Adorno
THEODOR WIESENGRUND ADORNO's influence on anglophone musicology is now so widespread, it seems as though hardly a new book on contemporary musical issues appears, or a conference season goes by, without his name featuring prominently. Yet it's not so...
Class Acts
One of the many ways in which the culture of the new millennium is dramatising its immaturity is in sweeping statements about classical music: less popular than ever, less accessible than ever, marginalised in schools, fossilised in concert halls and...
Context-Free
This is the first general biographical study of Janac ek to appear in English since Ian Horsbrugh's Leos Janac ek: the field that prospered, published over twenty years ago (and, incidentally, a book which doesn't make it into Zemanova's bibliography)....
Did Handel Invent the English Keyboard Concerto?
PETER HOLMAN challenges a long-held belief concerning the origins of a characteristic eighteenth-century genreIT HAS BEEN generally assumed that Handel invented the English type of keyboard concerto ever since 1776, when Sir John Hawkins wrote in his...
Falla in Britain
CHRIS COLLINS chronicles the Spanish master's five trips to the United KingdomTo-night there will be much excitement among the ultra-artistic set and lovers of the Russian ballet generally. For a new ballet will be produced by the wonderful Massine [...]...
From the Musical Times 100 Years Ago
The Dream of Gerontius in London (MT July 1903)AFTER waiting for an undue time, during which it has been heard in many parts of the world, Dr. Elgar's 'The Dream of Gerontius' has at last found its way to London. The circumstances of its introduction...
From the Musical Times 50 Years Ago
From 'Round aboul radio' (MT June 1953)ARTHUR BENJAMIN'S 'romantic melodrama', for which Cedric Cliffe ingeniously made a libretto out of Dickens's 'A Tale of Two Cities', is one of the two most striking British stage works I have heard since Ethel Smyth's...
Holloway and Ferneyhough at 60: Connections and Constellations
ARNOLD WHITTALL celebrates two distinctive musical responses to the fleeting and fragmentary in modern lifeBRIAN FERNEYHOUGH WAS BORN in Coventry on 16 January 1943, Robin Holloway in Leamington Spa on 19 October of the same year. These facts are the...
Letters
Mind or body?I remember with pleasure the Musical Times article in the springtime of my youth about the momentous discovery of the fifth part of Wagner's Ring; and the one (by Frank Pelleg, I seem to remember) demonstrating analytically that the fugues...
Means and Meanings
THREE RECENT BOOKS ON BACH suggest different ways to tackle the old conundrum of the critical versus the positivistic. While the German research institutes continue to establish the latter and provide the documents, the facts, the editions, the source-descriptions...
More Professional and Social Correspondence
New Samuel WesleyanaMICHAEL KASSLER & PHILIP OLLESON report on some recently discovered source materialWITH ANY REFERENCE BOOK it can confidently be predicted that new information will come to light shortly after it goes to press. Our Samuel Wesley...
Musicology and Meaning
'New' or 'ageing'? LAWRENCE KRAMER clears away some misconceptions surrounding postmodern musicology'THE NEW MUSICOLOGY' SEEMS here to stay. The New York Times even says it has 'swept the field'.1 Well and good: but what, exactly, is it?A phantom, for...
Networking
BRITTEN SCHOLARSHIP HAS BEEN revitalised by two fascinating contextual accounts of the composer: the late Philip Brett's entry in New Grove II and Paul Kildea's Selling Britten. Though very different in their emphases, each resonates with the other to...
Probing Poulenc
Carl B. Schmidt has already placed us in his debt with The music of Francis Poulenc, a catalogue of the composer's works published by Oxford University Press in 1995. Now he has produced a biography written in tandem with the catalogue and - at over...
Regime Change
For all the sterling efforts of William Christie and others, the music of the French Baroque has unfortunately failed to gain the wide acceptance of Vivaldi, Bach and Handel. Like the celebrated, but now underread, literature of the grand siecle of Louis...
Scribes & Pharisees
A strong revisionist case is at last being made for Parisian grand opera, which triumphed in circumstances where Berlioz and Wagner signally failed. Particularly associated with the Jewish composers Meyerbeer and Halevy, it has for all too long been...
Weighing Walton
AN OLD VIENNESE scholar, with tears in his eyes, after listening to Walton's Viola Concerto in the 1930s, says to his English colleague: 'Here's the real thing - at last.' Twenty-five years later, a ten-year-old English boy in his primary school wants...