Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute

Published quarterly by the Royal Anthropological Institute of Great Britain and Ireland, the Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute reports on anthropology, ethnology and the Royal Anthropological Institute. The editor of this journal is Simon Coleman.

Articles from Vol. 10, No. 1, March

Becoming a Christian in Fiji: An Ethnographic Study of Ontogeny
Ritualized activities pervade daily life in the villages of central Fiji, including the eight villages that make up the country (vanua) of Sawaieke on the island of Gau where I did fieldwork. (1) Specifically Christian rituals include prayer before...
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Books Received
ADU BOAHEN, A. et al. 'The history of Ashanti kings and the whole country itself' and other writings by Otumfuo. Nana Agyeman Prempeh I. x, 224 pp., tables, illus., bibliogr. Oxford: University Press for the British Academy, 2003. (cloth) ALLEN,...
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In Search of Ritual: Tradition, Outer World and Bad Manners in the Amazon
There is not much to set the Yaminawa apart from other small Nawa groups of the Jurua-Purus and Urubamba-Ucayali rivers in the southwestern Amazon. (1) They all belong to the Panoan linguistic family, live in a dense, sparsely populated forest, subsist...
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Reluctant Muslims: Embodied Hegemony and Moral Resistance in a Giriama Spirit Possession Complex
Spirit possession has had many scholarly interpreters, and as Michael Lambek (1981: 5) has pointed out, most of the early literature on possession focused on its possible causes or functions. These accounts tended to explain possession as a reflection...
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Taking Sides and Constructing Identities: Reflections on Conflict Theory
Many social scientists offer theories of conflict which focus on that which is contested, in other words the resources that contending parties fight about. Without denying the importance of these resource-orientated, economically or ecologically inspired...
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Techniques of Vision: Photography, Disco and Renderings of Present Perceptions in Highland Papua
In anthropological studies of photography--particularly photographic portraiture--it has been widely noted that photographs may be used to disclose persons in ways that are informed by local conventions and cosmology (see Sprague 1978). In short, photographs...
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The Place of Politics: Powerful Speech and Women Speakers in Everyday Pa'ikwene (Palikur) Life
Much, if not most, anthropological work on the topic poses 'political language' in terms of formalized speech used by 'instituted' (Bourdieu 1991) speakers in the formal arena (Bloch 1975; Brenneis & Myers 1984; Duranti 1994). This article argues...
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The Revealing Muteness of Rituals: A Psychoanalytical Approach to a Spanish Ceremony
Rituals remain among the most challenging objects of anthropology. Many analysts have tried to determine the function of rituals in social organization in terms of either channelling or of resolving conflicts (Gluckman 1963: 110-45; Turner 1968). The...
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'The Trial': (1) a Parody of the Law amid the Mockery of Men in Post-Colonial Papua New Guinea
Legal pluralism reflects a view of social order as being made up of multiple regulatory agencies. Legal pluralism studies have particularly, although not exclusively, focused on political situations, such as those in colonial or post-colonial states,...
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'Undoubtedly an Expert'? Anthropologists in British Asylum Courts
A 1987 dictum by Lord Bridge during an appeal hearing in the British House of Lords is often cited by lawyers representing asylum seekers, to remind the court about the seriousness of the issue before them: 'when an administrative decision [is] one...
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