Philosophy Today

Founded in 1957, Philosophy Today is a quarterly magazine published by DePaul University. The magazine has a circulation of over 1,000 readers and specializes in information on contemporary philosophy and philosophers. The Editor of the magazine is David W. Pellauer.

Articles from Vol. 43, 1999

"An Unsuitable Job for a Philosopher": Graduate Education and the Limits of the Profession
A panel at the Eastern division meeting of the American Philosophical Association was convened last winter to address the question, "How Can (and Should) Graduate Programs in Philosophy Train for Non-Academic Jobs?" Called in response to the prolonged...
Autonomy, Negativity, and Illusory Transgression: Menke's Deconstruction of Adorno's Aesthetics
Insofar as a social function can be predicated for artworks, it is their functionlessness. Through their difference from a bewitched reality, they embody negatively a position in which what is would find its rightful place, its own. -Adorno 1 The dysfunctional...
Cuts and Bonds: Husserl's Systematic Investigation of Representation
This essay was originally written for a panel devoted to some systematic aspects of Husserl's phenomenology. One might reasonably assume that the topic requires a clear conception of what systematic philosophy is. No such conception is put forward here,...
Dialectics of the Absolute: The Systematics of the Phenomenological System in Husserl's Last Period
My title indicates three central notions: Dialectics, the Absolute, and System. It is the notion of system that indicates the goal of this essay: namely, to bring together these three notions in a systematic coherence in order to elucidate the character...
Editor's Introduction
This 1999 Supplement to Philosophy Today contains Volume 25 of Selected Studies in Phenomenology and Existential Philosophy. The essays in this volume are selected from the program of the thirty-eighth annual meeting of the Society for Phenomenology...
Ethnic Labels and Philosophy: The Case of Latin-American Philosophy
Many histories of philosophy are arranged according to categories that appear to be national. It does not take very long in a library to find histories of French philosophy that claim to deal with the philosophies produced by the French nation, and the...
Fate and Fortune: Derrida on Facing the Future
In an intriguing passage in The Politics of Friendship, Jacques Derrida talks of the instability at the heart of thought of "the perhaps" as supposing "a certain type of resolution and a singular exposition at the crossroads of chance and necessity."...
From Time to the Flesh: Levinas and Merleau-Ponty
For both Levinas and Merleau-Ponty, the question of temporality is inseparably linked with that of corporeity. Indeed, the relation between these key terms constitutes one of the crucial points of contact between two otherwise disparate thinkers. This...
Is There Latin American Philosophy?
"Not to philosophize is still to philosophize." The philosophical discourse of the West asserts the amplitude of an all-inclusiveness [englobement] or an ultimate comprehension. It compels every other discourse to justify itself before philosophy. ....
Language and Subject in Heidegger and Kristeva
The usefulness of Martin Heidegger's model of selfhood in Being and Mme for a reexamination of what or who the self is, has begun to be debated by philosophers, among them feminists1 who are searching out an alternative account ofhuman agency or subjectivity...
Lenin, Nancy, and the Politics of Total War
Everything which touches on politics may be fatal to philosophy. Louis Althusser At or rather near its heart, my essay is concerned with the question "what is to be done?" I pursue it because, as Nancy says, it is "on everyone's lips (including the philosopher):'...
Naturalizing Phenomenology
For all of our late twentieth-century optimism about overcoming, or at least leaving behind, those old philosophical hobby horses like solipsism and mind-body dualism, and for all ofour confidence in believing ourselves finally freed from, for having...
Of Ghosts, Commodities, and Women: Irigaray and Derrida
At the beginning of Specters of Marx, Jacques Derrida states the following: "to learn to live with ghosts, in the upkeep, the conversation, the company, or the companionship. . . . To live otherwise and better. No, not better, but more justly. But with...
On the Presence of Bergson in Deleuze's Nietzsche
Gilles Deleuze's early years were occupied by a number of studies on individual figures belonging to the history of Western philosophy and literature, a move that he later interpreted as the attempt to give voice to a "minor tradition." This minor tradition...
Operative Levity in Inoperative Communities
Philosophy distinguishes itself by the unique way it profits from death . . . -Jean-Luc Nancy, The Birth to Presence Robert Bernasconi once said in a conversation that Jean-Luc Nancy's work on community lacks an adequate, historical account of the concepts...
Phenomenology, Psychoanalysis, and the Hermeneutics of Suspicion
This realisation of language, now only serving as an eff"aced coin passed from hand to hand in silence . . . indicates the pure function of language, which is to assure us that we are, and nothing more. That one is capable of speaking to no purpose is...
Philosophy and the Colonial Difference
In the 1950s the distinguished ethno-historian and expert in Ancient Mexico, Miguel Leon-Portilla, published his classical book titled La filosofia Nanuatl. He did not have to wait long for criticism and one of the major attacks was his "imprudent" use...
Re-Thinking Husserl's Fifth Meditation
I would like to begin by stating my conclusion and by offering a pertinent aside on the term "embodiment." My conclusion is that the Fifth Meditation is replete with clues leading to genuine understandings of the foundations of intersubjectivity.1 To...
Sexual Difference, Phenomenology, and Alterity
"One is not born, but rather becomes, a woman." I begin with this phrase from Simone de Beauvoir's The Second Sex, a phrase often quoted-perhaps too often-but one which this year and in this context is particularly appropriate. For not only is The Second...
The Matrix or Malebranche in Hollywood
When I saw The Matrix at a local theatre in Slovenia, I had the unique opportunity of sitting close to the ideal spectator of the film-namely, to an idiot. A man in his late twenties at my right was so immersed in the film that he continuously disturbed...
The Relevance of Nonsymbolic Cognition to Husserl's Fifth Meditation
In his Cartesian Meditations at the outset of the Fifth Meditation, Edmund Husserl proposes to sketch an account of how the meaning "other person" comes to be bestowed on certain items encountered in the perceived surrounding world. As he states the...
Voices of Chiapas: The Zapatistas, Bakhtin, and Human Rights
Despite the difference in their national and cultural backgrounds, the Russian thinker Mikhail Bakhtin1 and the Zapatista movement in Chiapas have much in common. Both respond to the betrayal ofthe promises of the revolutions in their countries.2 Both...
Wretched Desire: Bataille and Kristeva on Abjection
This great factory operated upon a mysterious system of production costs: taking no account of the economic dictum that capital investment should produce a return, it was dedicated to a monstrous nothingness. No wonder then that each morning the workers...